Archive for "February, 2020"

NBA: Heat retire O’Neal’s No. 32 jersey

Posted in jetevarl on February 10th, 2020

first_imgTaiwan minister boards cruise ship turned away by Japan PLAY LIST 01:31Taiwan minister boards cruise ship turned away by Japan01:33WHO: ‘Global stocks of masks and respirators are now insufficient’01:01WHO: now 31,211 virus cases in China 102:02Vitamin C prevents but doesn’t cure diseases like coronavirus—medic03:07’HINDI PANG-SPORTS LANG!’03:03SILIP SA INTEL FUND Smart hosts first 5G-powered esports exhibition match in PH Retired Hall of Fame basketball player Shaquille O’Neal’s jersey is raised during halftime at an NBA basketball game between the Los Angeles Lakers and the Miami Heat, Thursday, Dec. 22, 2016, in Miami. The Heat retired O’Neal’s No. 32 jersey. (AP Photo/Alan Diaz)Shaquille O’Neal fulfilled a promise in 2006 to bring Miami its first NBA championship and the Heat said thank you on Thursday by retiring his No. 32 jersey.The jersey was lifted to the rafters in an emotional but sometimes light-hearted halftime ceremony that included O’Neal’s mother, Lucille, arriving on the court behind the wheel of a scaled-down 18-wheel truck.ADVERTISEMENT EDITORS’ PICK As fate of VFA hangs, PH and US forces take to the skies for exercise NBA: Ex-Nuggets coach George Karl lambasts Carmelo Anthony in new book Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next We are young Chinese-manned vessel unsettles Bohol town Shanghai officials reveal novel coronavirus transmission modes Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. It was a miniature version — right down to the words “Diesel Power” written on the side — of the semi that O’Neal once drove into town when he made that initial promise back in 2004.But the best thing about Thursday night for the Heat was they rallied from a 19-point second-quarter deficit to beat O’Neal former team, the Los Angeles Lakers, 115-107 and snap a three-game losing skid.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSGinebra teammates show love for SlaughterSPORTSWe are youngSPORTSFreddie Roach: Manny Pacquiao is my Muhammad AliO’Neal deflected the praise Thursday, thanking Heat boss Pat Riley as well as his teammates, especially star guard Dwyane Wade, who became the other half of the club’s one-two scoring punch.“When you win championships, it becomes contagious. I felt like I still had a lot to give I just needed another piece. D-Wade was that piece,” O’Neal said. “It was already his team so I wasn’t going to redecorate the Christmas tree.” Smart’s Siklab Saya: A multi-city approach to esports “We knew the fans were going to be out here to see Shaq’s jersey hanging. We knew it was going to electric, and we wanted to give them a show. It was a lot of fun playing in this arena tonight.”Whiteside and Winslow each had 23 points and 13 rebounds. Whiteside has 23 double-doubles this season, tying him for the NBA lead with Russell Westbrook and James Harden.It was the first career double-double for the second-year forward Winslow as the Heat (10-20) snapped their three-game losing streak. All three of those losses came at home.Paul hurtIn Los Angeles, despite losing Chris Paul to a hamstring injury, the Los Angeles Clippers beat the San Antonio Spurs 106-101 at Staples Center.Paul suffered a strained left hamstring early in the third quarter and did not return. He finished with team-high 19 points, six assists and seven rebounds in 23 minutes.Without Paul, the Clippers received a boost from their bench. Marreese Speights had 14 points, seven rebounds and five assists, while Raymond Felton added 13 points. Jamal Crawford chipped in 11 points. The Clippers’ reserves outscored the Spurs’ bench 58-31.Elsewhere, Isaiah Thomas scored 28 points, including 14 in the fourth quarter, and the Boston Celtics defeated the Indiana Pacers 109-102.Boston won its fourth in a row, sealing it with two free throws from Thomas and two from Jae Crowder during the final 14 seconds after Indiana closed to within 105-102 on two C.J. Miles free throws with 19 seconds to play.Jeff Teague had a season-high 31 for Indiana, which lost its second straight. Paul George and Miles each had 19 for the Pacers, and Thaddeus Young added 15 points and 12 rebounds. MOST READ Retired Hall of Fame basketball player Shaquille O’Neal shouts and waves to the fans after his jersey was raised during halftime at an NBA basketball game between the Los Angeles Lakers and the Miami Heat, Thursday, Dec. 22, 2016, in Miami. The Heat retired O’Neal’s No. 32 jersey. (AP Photo/Alan Diaz)Heat coach Erik Spoelstra, whose team trailed by seven points at halftime, said Miami got an emotional lift from listening to Shaq’s acceptance speech.“It was like going down memory lane. It felt like 2006,” he said. “Shaq engaged the entire crowd with incredible class.“Our players were sitting there with eyes wide open. They saw a vision of what we’re trying to build and what the arena is like when you have a legitimate championship-contending team. It was a special presentation.”Indeed it was. O’Neal’s message didn’t go unnoticed by Justise Winslow. He scored a career-high 23 points and Hassan Whiteside had his sixth double-double in a row to lead Miami past the struggling Lakers, who have fallen on hard times since the days of O’Neal and Kobe Bryant.“It was a great environment,” said Winslow, who posted a career high in points and a season high in rebounds.ADVERTISEMENT Senators to proceed with review of VFA PH among economies most vulnerable to virus Where did they go? Millions left Wuhan before quarantine Chinese-manned vessel unsettles Bohol town View commentslast_img read more

Brazil fails to give adequate public access to Amazon land title data, study finds

Posted in hedadxww on February 10th, 2020

first_imgArticle published by hayat Brazil possesses vast tracts of public lands, especially in the Amazon, which exist in the public domain. Traditional peoples, landless movements, quilombolas (communities established more than a century ago by Afro-Brazilian slave descendants), and other homesteaders have the legal right to lay claim to these lands.It is the job of state land tenure agencies to keep track of these public lands, regulating the allocation of land and property rights to secure protection for individuals and communities against forcible evictions, and to monitor against illegal deforestation, large illegal land grabs and other illicit activities.However, a recent study found that none of eight Amazonian states met all the mandated transparency criteria. Active transparency indicators (data accessible on the internet or via public documents) were missing 56 percent of the time. Passive transparency indicators (data available on request) fared poorly as well.The inefficiency of land tenure agencies in providing land titling information contributes to numerous land conflicts, and increases insecurity in the countryside. The lack of transparency also enhances the possibility of fraud. When the poor are deprived of rightful land title data, the wealthy often have the upper hand if land disputes go to court. Illegal deforestation in the Brazilian Amazon. Image by NASA via Wikimedia Commons (Public domain).Brazil’s Pará state includes a vast area of public lands the size of the U.S. state of California — roughly 450,000 square kilometers (174,000 square miles) — tracts not classified as national parks or indigenous reserves, but held in the public domain. Would-be legal occupants of this government property (including traditional peoples, landless peasants, or other homesteaders), who wish to build on these lands, or want to take out land-related loans, or simply need to ensure that they can continue to live where they are, need official recognition of their land tenure status.The recognition of land titles on these public lands is determined via land title records maintained by state land tenure agencies; information that must by law be accurate and made legally available to all members of the public in order to prevent land disputes.However, a new study highlights a serious lack of transparency by the state land tenure agencies, and found major failings in their provision of access to data related to claims on public domain lands. Of the eight Amazonian states studied (Acre, Amapá, Amazonas, Maranhão, Mato Grosso, Pará, Roraima and Tocantins), none met all of the mandated criteria for transparency.“There is a gap that contradicts the [law] and prevents the creation of effective public policies in territory management,” said Brenda Brito, a co-author of the study and researcher at the Institute of Man and Environment of the Amazon (Imazon). “Consequently, the control and monitoring by society and government bodies such as the Public Ministry and courts of law are impaired.”Pasture in Brazil. Image by Rhett A. Butler/Mongabay.It is very important that land tenure agencies be able to provide clear, accurate and accessible information to the public to assure efficient and fair management of public lands. These institutions regulate the allocation of land and property rights in order to secure protection for individuals and communities against forcible evictions, as well as monitoring against activities such as illegal deforestation and large illegal land grabs.The 2011 Law on Access to Public Information (LAI) mandates that information produced, managed and stored by states concerning all public lands must be readily accessible to the public. But Imazon’s comprehensive, 118-page study finds that this isn’t the case.The researchers attempted to test for both “active” and “passive” transparency with regard to access to information such as location of public lands, lists and maps of real-estate applications, and land titles already issued. Active transparency refers to data made accessible on the internet or through public documents by the state land tenure agencies. Active transparency indictors were missing from records an average of 56 percent of the time, the study found. The state of Tocantins had the worst performance on this score (79 percent), while Pará scored highest (29 percent).Passive transparency means that the information is available upon request to the agencies, who must respond within 20 days. To evaluate passive transparency, the researchers sent messages through the electronic Citizens Information Service (e-SIC) platform and physical letters through the post office. In the case of the e-SIC platform, the agencies in five states, excepting Acre, Roraima and Mato Grosso, responded within 20 days. In the case of the letters sent, most agencies didn’t respond at all.“People who live in the countryside and want to regularize [get legal title to] their land need to know if the property in question falls within the legal ownership/titling options; if someone else is currently [applying for] or has obtained the equitable title of the area; or if there are [legal] conflicts involving the land,” Brito said. “Today, with little information available, [land titling] is impossible, which only increases insecurity in the countryside.”One of the requirements for securing land tenure is that people be living on the property in question. However, disputes can arise, and fraud can occur when, for example, wealthy land grabbers employ poor local people who falsely claim they are occupying the land, when in fact they are only temporarily occupying the ground while deforesting it.Often, it is other locals who are best suited to verify and legitimize the claims of a variety of would-be homesteaders. That’s why the land tenure agencies “allow locals to assist in monitoring whether the legal requirements for titling have been met,” Brito said. That “allows, for example, denunciations of people who only want to appropriate public lands, but do not live there and often use illegal deforestation as the only sign of occupation.”A herd of cattle in the Amazon. Image by Rhett A. Butler/Mongabay.Most public land occupation in northern Brazil is driven by cattle ranching, the nation’s largest contributor to illegal deforestation. In the Amazon, more than 60 percent of deforested land is used for pasture. Inadequate state land tenure agency transparency regarding property ownership has helped facilitate this illegal land occupation, as well as illicit activities such as deforestation, to flourish. It has also resulted in rightful property claimants being pushed off their lands.Beyond the environmental impact, this rural land insecurity has other dire implications. According to records kept by the Pastoral Land Commission, an arm of Brazil’s Catholic Church, there is a land conflict-related murder in Brazil every 12 days on average.“There is a mistaken understanding by land agencies that whoever occupies public land has the right to possession and to secrecy,” said Dário Cardoso, Jr., a lawyer and co-author of the study. “The lack of transparency, besides provoking conflicts, can generate suspicions of undue favoring of groups and individuals.”“Transparency in information involving public assets and resources is the best defense against fraud,” he added.Some issues preventing transparency include out-of-date agency websites and a lack of settlement maps, including maps of territories occupied by quilombolas, Afro-Brazilian runaway slave descendants whose legal community land rights were recognized in 2003. There are other transparency problems too: in one case in Pará, a building where land documents were stored was closed due to structural safety concerns. More seriously, in Mato Grosso, the state decreed that the land database be inaccessible for an indefinite period, despite the federal transparency mandate.Despite these major limitations, researchers say there are efforts and initiatives underway to increase transparency. They’ve called on the new government, which took office at the start of this year, to make access to land information, especially information about the titling process, a priority.“The new [state] governors … must include among their challenges transparency on public lands,” Brito said. “This is a great asset of the population, threatened by illegal practices, illegal deforestation, and land conflicts.”Banner image of a patchwork of legal forest reserves, pastures and soy farms in the Brazilian Amazon by Rhett A. Butler/Mongabay.Citation:Cardoso Jr., D., Oliveira, R., Brito, B. 2018. Transparência de órgãos fundiários na Amazônia Legal (p. 116). Belém: Imazon. Agriculture, Amazon Agriculture, Amazon Conservation, Amazon Destruction, Amazon People, Cattle, Cattle Pasture, Cattle Ranching, Controversial, Corruption, Deforestation, Drivers Of Deforestation, Environment, Environmental Crime, Environmental Politics, Featured, Forests, Green, Indigenous Peoples, Indigenous Rights, Industrial Agriculture, Land Conflict, Land Grabbing, Land Rights, Land Use Change, Rainforest Deforestation, Rainforest Destruction, Rainforests, Saving The Amazon, Social Justice, Threats To The Amazon, Traditional People, Tropical Deforestation center_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

Conservation may offer common ground in Afghan conflict

Posted in avadfeqk on February 10th, 2020

first_imgArticle published by Rhett Butler Animals, Archive, Biodiversity, Conservation, Featured, Interviews, Mammals, Protected Areas, Snow Leopards, Wildlife Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredcenter_img War, drugs, corruption, and terrorism are terms Westerners are more likely to associate with Afghanistan than biodiversity conservation. But Alex Dehgan says conservation has the potential to offer a bridge toward a more peaceful Afghanistan.Dehgan lays out his case in a new book titled The Snow Leopard Project And Other Adventures In Warzone Conservation. The book follows Dehgan’s unorthodox career from a biologist and legal expert in Russia to his time with the Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS) setting up Afghanistan’s first national park.Dehgan argues that there is “an implicit understanding” among Afghans “of the links between conservation of the natural environment and their survival”.Dehgan spoke about his adventures in conservation in Afghanistan in an April 2019 interview with Mongabay. War, drugs, corruption, and terrorism are terms Westerners are more likely to associate with Afghanistan than biodiversity conservation. But Alex Dehgan, a conservation technologist who runs the Washington D.C.-based Conservation X Labs and formerly served as the Chief Scientist at the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID), says conservation has the potential to offer a bridge toward a more peaceful Afghanistan.Camera trap picture of a snow leopard in Lower Wakhan-Badakhshan. Photo credit WCSDehgan lays out his case in The Snow Leopard Project And Other Adventures In Warzone Conservation, a book published this past January. The book, which traces Dehgan’s unorthodox career from a biologist and legal expert who helped craft environmental laws in Russia after the collapse of the Soviet Union to his work with lemurs in Madagascar to his time with the Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS) setting up Afghanistan’s first national park, argues that there is “an implicit understanding” among Afghans “of the links between conservation of the natural environment and their survival”.“Most people don’t realize that Afghanistan contains the western end of the Himalayan range, verdant coniferous and deciduous oak and cedar forests on steep hillsides, blistering red sandy deserts, Utah-like canyons and mesas, nor are they aware of its rich species diversity. Afghanistan is a country of brown bears, wolves, and caracals, hyenas, jackals and cheetahs, and elusive snow leopards, and at one point, tigers, and Asiatic cheetahs,” said Dehgan. “Eighty percent of the country is dependent on natural resources, and the fate of those resources affects wildlife, livestock, and humans alike. Moreover, the Afghans deeply identified with its spectacular wildlife. For a country where 20% of the population were refugees in Iran and Pakistan, protection of the Afghanistan’s unique species was a way to protect their identity.”Dehgan spoke about his time in Afghanistan and his career in an April 2019 interview with Mongabay.Alex Dehgan with a sifaka at Duke Lemur Center.Mongabay: What led you to write this book?Alex Dehgan: I felt that there was so much more to Afghanistan than the way it is portrayed on the evening news – a dusty, depressing landscape of pain, conflict, tribalism, and hopelessness. I wanted to show for both conservation, and for Afghanistan, that there could be optimism for the future of the country, for its people, and for its wildlife. I also wanted to portray the multilayered richness of the country, telling the stories from Afghanistan’s deep history, its amazing and gracious people, its incredible landscapes, ecologies, and geologies, and most of the incredible species that live in Afghanistan, representing a biological crossroads of Asia, Africa, and Indomalaya.Most people don’t realize that Afghanistan contains the western end of the Himalayan range, verdant coniferous and deciduous oak and cedar forests on steep hillsides, blistering red sandy deserts, Utah-like canyons and mesas, nor are they aware of its rich species diversity. Afghanistan is a country of brown bears, wolves, and caracals, hyenas, jackals and cheetahs, and elusive snow leopards, and at one point, tigers, and Asiatic cheetahs. This part of the world – Western & Central Asia, the Caucuses, the Levant, and North Africa have been largely ignored by much of the conservation community – but they are rich, important, and wondrous habitats that are deserving of our attention and effort. Finally, I wanted to tell the story because it is a great travel and conservation story, describing work done by many people and organizations, including those who came before and after me, that needed to be told.Little Pamir. Photo credit WCS/Don BedunahMongabay: What was one of your more harrowing experiences while working in Afghanistan?Alex Dehgan: We once drove into a mine field, and I am pretty sure I also walked into one, which was disturbing, but it wasn’t the single incident or experience that bothered me, it was the omnipresent danger underneath. In Afghanistan, my concern wasn’t just the active killers – like the risk of a car bomb, rocket, suicide attackers, kidnapping & murder (although I had lost friends and colleagues in Afghanistan and Iraq to these and they were real dangers) – it was also the hidden evils of war and conflict. These included the mines and unexploded ordinance – that have been irreprehensibly scattered across the landscape and forgotten, silently waiting across the decades to maim and kill. It was the fact that any earthquake could hit our poorly built office and could flatten it down as has happened in Iran and Pakistan, or that carbon monoxide would smoother us in our sleep or our water heaters would explode while we were exposed. It would be losing our way in the dark driving across rivers bloated by spring snow melt where the road would disappear in the rubble of glacial moraine. It was my teams who were far from help in extremely environments in rough and remote landscapes. It was ultimately the weight of was being responsible for the lives of all of the people who I sent into the field or into the city, the Afghans that worked for us who were threatened at home, that unsettled me.Member of WCS staff overlooks one of the travertine lakes that are part of Band-e-Amir National Park. Photo by WCS/Alex DehganMongabay: Conservation can be challenging under even the best circumstances. What were some of the unique issues in establishing Band-e-Amir, and the national parks in Afghanistan.Alex Dehgan: In some ways, Afghanistan was the easiest places for conservation that I had ever worked. We didn’t have the problems of corruption that I had seen with conservation work elsewhere, and we didn’t face the major bureaucratic challenges. We had incredible support and welcome from all levels of government and the Afghan people.There were still significant challenges. These came from the legacy of three decades of conflict. There was so little known for the last thirty years – we didn’t have good historical data that we could compare against. We needed to establish a set of rules and laws in a country that was just reestablishing the rule of law – this foundation was difficult to create in a place that had suffered from lawlessness for three decades.Security affected us in a multitude of ways. We had to be concerned not only by insurgent groups, but the drug trade, by mines and unexploded ordinance, by failed infrastructure, and planes that we would take labeled by the European Union as “flying coffins”, and by the threats to our staff and their families for collaborating with Americans. There was a risk WCS team members could be labeled as insurgents and killed by NATO and U.S. forces, or that we would be in the wrong place at the wrong time and get bombed or shot by either side of the (post)conflict.Finally, the remoteness of some of the areas we worked also required extraordinary logistics solutions. This remoteness cut two ways – it ultimately protected the wildlife, but it also required WCS teams to travel by Yak or horse for even weeks at a time through high elevation regions. Such remoteness that could be potentially fatal in an accident because it would take days to extract someone, even though we had contracted with teams of first responders with specialized high-altitude helicopters accompanied by soldiers to rescue our staff, and trained our team to self-rescue until help could arrive. We had tradeoffs we made in reaching our field sites – that we could put ballistic blankets under the cars to protect us from certain types of mines, but we couldn’t also support the weight of ballistic blankets or armoring on the sides of the vehicles which would protect us from gun fire since the vehicles would become too heavy to go into the field.Armed men in Nuristan. Photo credit: WCSRemnants of the war in Afghanistan. WCS/Alex DehganMongabay: And what are some of the similarities/cross-cutting issues between working in Afghanistan and other parts of the world?Alex Dehgan: Wildlife trade was a surprising issue in Afghanistan, but in this case, it was actually driven by the humanitarian community itself – the U.S. and NATO soldiers, the UN officials, the development NGOs and contractors. In some cases, wildlife and timber trafficking was linked to networks that were undermining the country’s security as well. Other issues were shared too – impacts of climate change, deforestation, and a lack of rule of law and effective environmental regulations.In Afghanistan, like other places in the world, a top-down approach to conservation wouldn’t work for people who have been fiercely independent for millennia. We needed to invest in and work with local communities to empower them to manage their own natural resources for their own survival and for that of the wildlife, and train them in the science and the consequences of their decisions – this was the genius of Peter Zahler at the WCS – who helped design the program. This is true whether you are working in Wyoming or the Wakhan Corridor. We had to reconcile economic interests of the local people and the wildlife, and create opportunities that would ultimately help both. Finally, we needed to tie the conservation of Afghanistan with the protection of Afghan identity, and create significant incentives to motivate others.Marco Polo sheep skull embedded in the soil with the Pamir mountains in the background, part of Afghanistan’s Wakhan National Park. Photo courtesy of WCS.Mongabay: Given the long-running conflict in Afghanistan, it seems like conservation would be a distant issue for most people. How was the case for Band-e-Amir made to decision-makers in the country? And how was Band-e-Amir received by the public in Afghanistan?Alex Dehgan: For westerners, the idea of conservation in Afghanistan was perhaps surprising. However, for the Afghans, there was an implicit understanding of the links between conservation of the natural environment and their survival. Eighty percent of the country is dependent on natural resources, and the fate of those resources affects wildlife, livestock, and humans alike. Moreover, the Afghans deeply identified with its spectacular wildlife. For a country where 20% of the population were refugees in Iran and Pakistan, protection of the Afghanistan’s unique species was a way to protect their identity. We were not significantly bothered by corruption when we started the program, but saw enthusiasm from members of parliament, from the national, provincial, and local governments, and for that, we are grateful.Afghan man carrying a stuffed leopard down the street in Kabul. The real driver of wildlife trafficking in Afghanistan was however international military forces, humanitarian NGOs, and development contractors. Credit WCS/Lisa Yook.Mongabay: How has wildlife fared in Afghanistan since you first arrived in 2006?Alex Dehgan: We believe better. The creation of new environmental laws, new environmental institutions, new protected areas, opportunities for revenue sources from tourism (which was the number two source of income in the country in 1979), and new cadre of environmental managers, from park guards to professionals, provide hope. However, I am most excited by the new leadership of Afghan conservationists, and this only comes because institutions like WCS, USAID, UNEP, UNDP, and others, have invested heavily into their education. They are the hope for the future.There are still serious concerns with wildlife trafficking, the number of weapons in the country as a result of decades of conflict, the security situation and the rule of law.WCS teams cross a small river in the Big Pamir, within the Wakhan Peninsula, which became part of Afghanistan’s second national park. Courtesy of WCS/Don Bedunah.Mongabay: What was you take away from the experience of working in Afghanistan? How did your time in Afghanistan inform or influence the work you do now at Conservation X Labs?Alex Dehgan: In the most fundamental sense, Afghanistan gave me a sense of profound optimism of our ability to address problems that are, upon first glance, seemingly impossible. If we could make conservation work in Afghanistan, we can address extinction and climate change.Many of the solutions we used in Afghanistan would also inform approach we would take at Conservation X Labs. In the WCS project, we would seek to understand and address the underlying drivers of extinction – from understanding the reasons behind the underlying degradation of the rangelands necessary to protect both Marco Polo Sheep and livestock – to creating programs to mitigate the persecution of snow leopards. We would also work to harness human behavior rather than fight against it. We used behavioral interventions such as social marketing by working through religious imams, and tying our work to the identity of the people itself, and changing perceptions and demands among the international community about acceptable behavior and how they saw Afghanistan. Much of our work at Conservation X Labs is about democratizing science and technology – to given anyone anywhere the tools to protect the environment. This was our work in Afghanistan too – to empower the local communities to protect their environment.Lastly, I was successful in Afghanistan because I worked to build a coalition of institutions and people – the successes we saw in Afghanistan weren’t due solely to me or even the WCS, but because many institutions and individuals – Afghan and international, including those that came before me and after me played a role in this effort. Conservation is too often competitive, and petty, but through our combined efforts – through partnerships – we can achieve much more.My experiences in Afghanistan would also profoundly affect my work with USAID later when I served as Chief Scientist. My insights into how USAID’s operations in Afghanistan were actually myopic and undermined U.S. overall strategic goals made me join USAID to reform the Agency itself. I found an agency that had significant deficiencies in how it measured impact, how it managed geospatial data, in the technical credentials of its staff, and their ability to create adaptive systems, in its procurement systems, that all influenced the reform efforts I developed and led under President Obama.WCS Rangelands Team next to an Alpine Lake in Big Pamir. Credit WCS/Don BedunahMongabay: How is the book being received so far?Alex Dehgan: The book has received exceptionally positive reviews so far, including by Nature, Science, NPR, and the trade press, and it has been selected as among the best new releases of the year to date by some environmental publications. What has been exciting is seeing the number of different book genres that the book has gotten traction in – from the expected – history and conservation – to the unexpected – entrepreneurship and innovation. Probably the best part of writing this book has been the total support I have gotten from people and institutions from my past and present, including the Wildlife Conservation Society and Duke University.Alex Dehgan, author of The Snow Leopard Project And Other Adventures In Warzone Conservation and founder of Conservation X Labs.last_img read more

Public education could curb bushmeat demand in Laos, study finds

Posted in rrfyekym on February 10th, 2020

first_imgA recent survey of markets in Laos found that the demand for bushmeat in urban areas was likely more than wildlife populations could bear.The enforcement of Laos’s laws controlling the wildlife trade appeared to do little to keep vendors from selling bushmeat, but fines did appear to potentially keep consumers from buying bushmeat.The researchers also found that consumers could be turned off of buying bushmeat when they learned of specific links between species and diseases. Fines and the threat of disease could dissuade consumers from buying bushmeat, according to recent surveys of markets where wildlife species are sold for food in the Southeast Asian country of Laos.A complex mix of issues, ranging from cultural preferences to nutritional needs, along with concerns about conservation and the possibility of disease transmission, combine to influence the sale of wild animals as bushmeat. To better understand these dynamics, a team of scientists from the Wildlife Conservation Society and other institutions set out to put some numbers to the risks and rewards of bushmeat consumption. They published their work April 22 in the journal Science of the Total Environment. A monitor lizard. Image by Charles J Sharp via Wikimedia Commons (CC BY-SA 4.0).In 2016 and 2017, the researchers surveyed vendors and individual customers and observed how they interacted with the animals and bushmeat for sale at “semi-urban” markets across the country.From their calculations, the team suggests that the amount of bushmeat sold in Laos is probably more than the wild populations from which the animals come can sustainably bear. The research showed that vendors sell more than 71 metric tons (78 tons) of bushmeat per year at the average Laotian market, worth about $500,000, although the authors point to the need for seasonal surveys to see if this pattern holds throughout the year.From questionnaires administered to both seller and buyers, the team found that most consumers bought bushmeat not because they needed the protein, but because they preferred the taste of it to livestock or they saw it as a healthier choice. The demand from these urban markets, where bushmeat is a luxury rather than a necessity, might be depriving rural communities that depend on subsistence hunting for protein where fewer alternatives, like livestock, are available. A schematic shows the various trade-offs involved in the bushmeat trade. Image courtesy of Pruvot et al., 2019 (CC BY 4.0).“Here again, a good understanding of wildlife consumer demography, economic status, and motivations is essential to the design of effective policy with limited un-intended consequences on more vulnerable communities,” the authors write.The study found that, in general, the threat of punishment for breaking Laos’s laws controlling the trade in wild animals appeared to do little to dissuade vendors. In fact, government workers were some of the most frequent consumers. When law enforcement did step in, around half of vendors would continue peddling bushmeat, and about half of those who did stop selling started up again within three days of a run-in with authorities. The researchers said they suspect that vendors see fines as part of the cost of doing business.However, most of the consumers themselves said a fine would probably get them to stop buying bushmeat. And the risk of disease appeared to have the potential to get some people to stop buying bushmeat. The survey data suggested that would most likely be the case when buyers knew of a specific link between a disease and a species found in a bushmeat market — civets and their connection with the SARS virus, for example, or the parasite risk associated with monitor lizard meat. A palm civet, pictured here in Cambodia. Image by Rhett A. Butler/Mongabay.These findings suggest the potential for public information campaigns to lower the demand for bushmeat, perhaps lowering the risk of disease transmission while also protecting populations of animals hunted for bushmeat and securing a critical source of food for subsistence hunters in the countryside.Banner image of weapons and bushmeat courtesy of the Wildlife Conservation Society. CitationPruvot, M., Khammavong, K., Milavong, P., Philavong, C., Reinharz, D., Mayxay, M., … & Theppangna, W. (2019). Toward a quantification of risks at the nexus of conservation and health: The case of bushmeat markets in Lao PDR. Science of The Total Environment. doi:10.1016/j.scitotenv.2019.04.266FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Article published by John Cannon Animals, Apes, Biodiversity, Biodiversity Crisis, Biodiversity Hotspots, Bushmeat, Cats, Conservation, Diseases, Ecology, Ecosystems, Endangered Species, Environment, Environmental Law, Extinction, Forests, Herps, Indigenous Peoples, Infectious Wildlife Disease, Law, Law Enforcement, Mammals, Natural Capital, Poaching, Primates, Rainforests, Reptiles, Research, Saving Species From Extinction, Tropical Forests, Wcs, Wildlife, Wildlife Conservation, Wildlife Trade, Wildlife Trafficking, Zoonotic Diseases center_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more