Nick Foles Is Not Carson Wentz And The Eagles Adjusted Accordingly

29 September 0

Yards/Completion …% of Passes by Air distance QuarterbackThrough AirAfter CatchTotal<=0 Yds1-10 Yds10+ Yds Around Thanksgiving, the idea that the Philadelphia Eagles would make it all the way to Super Bowl LII wouldn’t have surprised many people. Philadelphia started the season 10-1, and quarterback Carson Wentz emerged as the front-runner for league MVP honors. But after Wentz was lost to injury in Week 14, the Eagles’ title chances seemingly disappeared, too. Backups — like Philly’s stopgap, Nick Foles — seldom carry a team to Super Bowl glory. Carson Wentz7.74.812.415.5%44.3%40.2% *Playoff games onlySource: ESPN Stats & Information Group Nick Foles*5.56.712.228.646.025.4 In today’s NFL, throwing shorter passes isn’t always correlated with better outcomes. But Foles is succeeding in large part because his receivers are taking those short passes and running for big gains after the catch. With Wentz under center, the Eagles’ pass-catchers produced only 98.6 yards after the catch per game (eighth-fewest in football); with Foles in the playoffs, they’ve nearly doubled that output (164.5 YAC/game). In particular, they’re doing a ton of damage on screen passes, which Pederson seldom utilized with Wentz. Running back Jay Ajayi, for instance, went from gaining just 7.4 yards after catch per game with Wentz during the regular season1In the five games immediately after Ajayi was acquired from the Miami Dolphins in late October. to 51.0 yards per game in the postseason, including nearly 30 receiving yards per game on screens alone. Foles is also making smart reads and getting the ball out very quickly. In the playoffs, he’s averaging 2.39 seconds before each pass, a mark that would have been fourth-fastest in the NFL during the regular season. (Wentz, for comparison, was 17th-fastest, at 2.54 seconds.) Foles has used that quick release to lethal effect when conducting the run-pass option — which is more than just a ubiquitous piece of announcer-speak during Eagles broadcasts. The RPO helps freeze defenses with the added threat of handing off to a dangerous runner like Ajayi, and it lends itself to the types of quick passes that Foles has excelled at this postseason. Philly ran plenty of RPOs even before Foles took over, but that section of the playbook has been crucial to Pederson’s resurrection of the Chip Kelly-era version of Foles.Now, it remains to be seen which version will show up for the Super Bowl this Sunday. The conditions have been right for Foles to succeed in the playoffs thus far — Philadelphia hasn’t had to play from behind much and has enjoyed one of the league’s most drastic home-field advantages. But there’s no telling what will happen if things go off script. That’s why the Eagles need to stay out of third-and-long, where the drop-off from Wentz to Foles is really glaring. (On third down with 8 or more yards to go, Wentz was the NFL’s top passer this season according to ESPN’s Total Quarterback Rating; only Green Bay’s Aaron Rodgers was even remotely close.) They need to keep feeding the ball to Ajayi, who’s averaging roughly the same number of yards from scrimmage in these playoffs (98.5 per game) as he did during his All-Pro season with Miami in 2016. And perhaps most importantly, Foles needs to keep playing mistake-free football: Only 8.2 percent of his passes have been off-target this postseason — a rate that would easily have ranked No. 1 in the league during the regular season.He could do all of that, of course, and still fall short: Tom Brady could always reach into his bag of comeback tricks, and there’s also the small detail of Brady and Bill Belichick’s 15-0 record in the playoffs against teams that they’re facing for the first time in a season. But putting those metaphysical factors aside, the Patriots have their own vulnerabilities. They aren’t exactly a defensive powerhouse, having ranked ninth-worst in the NFL in expected points added during the regular season. And although that number improved as the year went on, they still allowed the league’s fourth-highest QBR on passes that traveled fewer than 10 yards through the air — the kinds of throws they’re likely to see a ton of from Foles and company. If the Eagles can execute their newfound offense and resist Brady’s supercharged comeback powers, there are plenty of reasons to think Foles (of all people) will be the one to deliver Philadelphia its long-awaited Super Bowl parade down Broad Street.Check out our latest NFL predictions. Foles did little to suggest otherwise in four mostly lackluster appearances to close the regular season. But he spent the month of January proving himself up to the challenge. With 352 yards (on 26-for-33 passing) and three touchdowns versus Minnesota, he produced one of the greatest QB performances in conference championship history. The game brought back memories of Foles’s 2013 season in Philadelphia, when he posted the third-best single-season passer rating in NFL history. But it was also a testament to the adjustments that Philadelphia coach Doug Pederson made to accommodate the different strengths of Wentz and Foles.Under both Wentz in the regular season and Foles during the playoffs, the Eagles’ offense averaged over 390 yards per game. But those yards were accumulated in different ways. Before Wentz’s injury, Philly was a balanced team whose aerial attack primarily relied on the power of its quarterback’s arm — often assisted by Wentz’s magician-like ability to improvise and buy time in the pocket. One thing it didn’t do, however, was ask receivers to do lots of work after hauling in the football. Through Week 14, Wentz led the league in touchdown passes per attempt and ranked third in air yards per attempt, according to ESPN’s Stats & Information Group, but his targets were only 22nd in yards after the catch per reception.Foles connected on three 40-yard passes against the Vikings. But those have been big exceptions to the Eagles’ general approach with Foles at the helm, which has been to throw much shorter. In the playoffs, Foles’s average pass has traveled 7.1 yards through the air. Compare that with Wentz’s average of 9.8 air yards per attempt during the regular season, and you can begin to see how Pederson has shifted his offense’s focus. Forty percent of Wentz’s passes went 10 or more yards downfield, compared with 25 percent for Foles in the playoffs. And Foles has actually thrown a larger share of his passes to players at or behind the line of scrimmage (29 percent) than 10 yards past it. Philly’s passing offense changed in the playoffsDistance traveled through the air — and after the catch — for passes by Philadelphia Eagles quarterbacks, 2017 season read more

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Mariano Riveras Unanimous Induction Shows An Evolving Cooperstown

29 September 0

Mariano Rivera100.0%100.0%0.0% Todd Helton16.519.53.0 Larry Walker54.662.27.6 Mike Mussina76.774.5-2.2 Roy Halladay85.491.25.8 Miguel Tejada1.20.8-0.4 Barry Bonds59.161.82.7 Edgar Martinez85.482.3-3.1 Roger Clemens59.563.33.8 Fred McGriff39.843.43.6 The Hall of Fame has four new membersActual results of the 2019 Baseball Hall of Fame election vs. our finalpre-announcement projection Andy Pettitte9.95.9-4.0 Curt Schilling60.961.10.2 Manny Ramirez22.825.02.2 Roy Oswalt0.90.90.0 Sammy Sosa8.58.90.4 Gary Sheffield13.614.40.8 Lance Berkman1.21.0-0.2 Andruw Jones7.510.42.9 PlayerActual ResultFinal Model Projection*Error The Mussina miss notwithstanding, our projections were pretty accurate, with an average error of 2.1 percentage points; only the totals of Halladay and Larry Walker were off by more than 4 points.3Shoutout to Jason Sardell, whose alternative model did even better, with an average error of 0.9 points.Appearing fifth, sixth and seventh in the actual voting were Curt Schilling, Roger Clemens and Barry Bonds. Schilling jumped to 60.9 percent from 51.2 percent last year. He has three years of eligibility remaining on the BBWAA ballot. Meanwhile, Bonds and Clemens, whose careers were tainted by allegations of performance-enhancing drug use, could only inch up on a crowded field. Clemens received 59.5 percent, up from 57.3 percent last year. Bonds received 59.1 percent of the vote, up from 56.4 percent in 2018. Their glacial rate of improvement means they will be hard-pressed to hit the required 75 percent in their three remaining years on the ballot; they appear to have hit a plateau. Scott Rolen17.219.52.3 Jeff Kent18.118.20.1 Michael Young2.11.3-0.8 The only question about Mariano Rivera’s candidacy for the Baseball Hall of Fame was whether he would be the first player voted in unanimously by the Baseball Writers’ Association of America, which serves as the primary gatekeeper for entry to the Hall. On Tuesday, the great New York Yankees pitcher became the first player to appear on 100 percent of writers’ ballots, with all 425 voters finally agreeing on something: that Rivera should be enshrined in Cooperstown, New York.With his ballot sweep, the fearsome closer did something unmatched by even the greatest of his starting pitcher brethren, including Nolan Ryan, Greg Maddux, Tom Seaver and Randy Johnson — all of whom topped 97 percent. Three years ago, Ken Griffey Jr. came the closest to complete consensus when he received 99.32 percent of the vote — just three ballots short.Rivera, eligible for the first time this year, was joined by three other inductees — the late Roy Halladay (85.4 percent of ballots), longtime Seattle designated hitter Edgar Martinez (85.4 percent) and former Oriole and Yankee pitcher Mike Mussina (76.7 percent).1Voters are limited to 10 names per ballot. Based on ballots that had been made public before the announcement, we were expecting that Rivera, Halladay and Martinez would gain entry to the Hall. As of our last model run,2Conducted just a few minutes before the announcement, when 232 ballots had been revealed. we thought Mussina was just a borderline case. Billy Wagner16.717.60.9 *With 232 public ballots known.Sources: Baseball Writers’ Association of America, RYAN THIBODAUX’S BASEBALL HALL OF FAME VOTE TRACKER Omar Vizquel42.841.9-0.9 Walker, however, is rapidly trending toward Cooperstown: He ranked eighth in voting percentage (54.6 percent), making a substantial leap from 34.1 percent last year. Next year will be his final year of eligibility, and he’s still 20 points short of election — usually an impossible task. But this year proved that Walker is capable of such a massive gain, so his candidacy is likely to provide genuine suspense next year.But Tuesday was headlined by Rivera making history.Anyone familiar with baseball knows of Rivera’s excellence. There is a strong case to be made that he is the greatest reliever in history. The 13-time All-Star is the sport’s all-time saves leader with 652. He was a part of five World Series championship teams in New York. In addition to his regular-season dominance, he has the lowest career postseason ERA (0.70) and most playoff saves (42) in MLB history.And when using advanced measures to evaluate performance, Rivera stands out not just as a great relief pitcher — only Dennis Eckersley ranks higher among relievers in the JAWS metric that combines career and peak performance to evaluate Hall candidates — but as an all-time great pitcher regardless of role.His ERA+ — which adjusts a pitcher’s earned run average for ballpark and run environment, enabling comparison between eras — ranks No. 1 all-time among all pitchers (minimum 1,000 innings).Traditional statistics like wins and saves are increasingly viewed as poor measures to evaluate performance because they award or penalize pitchers for many factors out of their control. But even the most common new-age measure to evaluate performance, wins above replacement, is inadequate to measure reliever performance because it is in part volume-based, and relievers pitch fewer innings than starters. Better measures to evaluate the performance of relief pitchers are statistics like win probability added, which tallies the change in win expectancy between plate appearance, and a context-neutral version of win probability added (WPA/leverage index).For instance, Rivera is 77th all-time in Baseball-Reference.com pitching WAR. But he ranks fifth all-time in WPA (56.6), trailing only Clemens, Lefty Grove, Maddux and Warren Spahn. In other words, he’s among the elite of the elite.Of course, relievers face a greater proportion of high-leverage situations than starting pitchers do; protecting a one-run lead in the ninth inning is more critical than pitching with a one-run lead in, say, the second. But even when employing a context-neutral win probability (WPA/leverage index), Rivera still ranks as the 21st-most win-adding pitcher of all time and is 13 spots higher than the next reliever (Hoyt Wilhelm at No. 34).Rivera combined elite command with an almost unhittable pitch: his cut fastball. Though just a portion of his career took place during the pitch-tracking era, he ranks second to Dodgers stopper Kenley Jansen in the run value of his cutter.Rivera is just the eighth pitcher to work primarily as reliever to be enshrined. The others are Wilhelm, Rollie Fingers, Eckersley, Bruce Sutter, Goose Gossage, Trevor Hoffman and Lee Smith. Three have joined the Hall since last year — Rivera, Smith (veterans committee, 2019) and Hoffman (BBWAA vote, 2018) — and the number of relievers figures to grow over time as bullpens are used in an ever-greater share of innings. Last season, relievers accounted for a record 40.1 percent of innings.The only position group with fewer players in the Hall than relief pitchers is the designated hitter group. Despite not playing a position in the field for much of his career, Martinez’s bat was so dominant that he made it to the Hall in his final year on the ballot.Martinez’s career OPS+4OPS+ considers a hitter’s overall ability but adjusts to account for ballpark and run-scoring environment. An OPS+ of 100 is league average. of 147 is tied for the 42nd-best mark of all time. Martinez joins Frank Thomas and Harold Baines — another 2019 veterans committee selection5Baines, a controversial pick in December, had a career OPS+ of 121, tied for 340th place. — as the only players in the Hall to play more than half their games at DH. Thomas ranks 52nd all time in batting WAR (73.9), while Martinez ranks 80th (68.4).Halladay, who died in a 2017 plane crash, tied with Bob Feller for 41st in all-time pitching WAR (65.5). He tied for 37th in all-time ERA+ (131). The two-time Cy Young Award winner was the ultimate workhorse for his era, leading his league in innings pitched four times and exceeding 230 innings six times. He’s also the only player other than Don Larsen to throw a no-hitter in the postseason.Mussina pitched in hitter-favorable ballparks and during the high scoring “steroid era” of the late 1990s to early 2000s. While his traditional stats might not seem elite, his career WAR (83.0) and JAWS (63.8) totals rank ahead of the average (73.4 WAR, 61.8 JAWS) for Hall of Fame pitchers.A few years ago, it was hard to imagine pitchers like Mussina, with a 3.68 ERA before adjustments, or Halladay, with barely 200 wins, getting into the Hall of Fame. And it was probably unthinkable that anyone — let alone a relief pitcher — would be elected unanimously. But the Hall of Fame electorate is changing, and that seems to be increasing both the quality and quantity of the players being elected. read more

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Anyone Could Win The AFC North — Except The Browns

28 September 0

5ClevelandAFC North5.93-2.9 To go with our 2016 NFL predictions, FiveThirtyEight is previewing each division. RANKTEAMDIVISIONPROJECTEDACTUALDIFFERENCE AFC North fans are blessed with one of the NFL’s most exciting divisions. The Pittsburgh Steelers, Baltimore Ravens and Cincinnati Bengals have all been successful and evenly matched, politely taking turns in the top spot. In fact, the AFC North is the only division that has never had a back-to-back-to-back champion: 3BaltimoreAFC North9.35-4.3 2015 WINS The Ravens’ 2015 misfortune was twofold. They did terribly in close games, with their first eight losses coming by margins of six, four, four, three, five, eight, two and two. They also had a ridiculous number of injuries. Neither of these issues were totally random; strategy can cost teams in close games, and players are more likely to get injured when they’re members of one of the NFL’s oldest rosters. But luck played a major part too, and the Ravens are a trendy bounceback candidate for 2016, with Vegas putting their over/under at 8.5 wins. We expect them to improve as well, but only to 7.6.Cleveland BrownsWhile AFC North has never had a repeat champion, it does have the most predictable bottom-feeder in the NFL: 2San DiegoAFC West8.44-4.4 How will your favorite NFL team do this year? See all of our predictions for the 2016 season » This year will not be the year that streak is broken. And while Cincinnati took the crown in 2015, we give them just a 36 percent chance of repeating.Pittsburgh SteelersIt’s hard not to think of the Steelers as a defensive team. The franchise that gave us the Steel Curtain also had the best sustained defense of the 21st century. From 2000 to 2012 they allowed the fewest yards in the NFL six times and finished in the top 10 every season.No longer. The Steelers have quickly transformed into an offense-first squad, 21st in yards against and 3rd in yards gained last season. They have the best wide receiver in the NFL and the best running back unit (after Le’Veon Bell wraps up his three-game suspension). They went 8-4 in 2015 when QB Ben Roethlisberger wasn’t out with an injury, and Vegas has them at 10-1 to win Super Bowl LI. That’s tied with Panthers and behind only the Patriots, Seahawks and Packers. Our biggest misses of 2015 4San FranciscoNFC West8.05-3.0 The Cleveland Browns have finished last in the AFC North for five straight years and in 11 of the last 14 seasons. It’s the kind of franchise that’s in a position to make some gambles, so this season they signed quarterback Robert Griffin III and made him their starting QB.The saga of RGIII has been such a bummer these last couple of seasons that it’s easy to forget just how great he was in 2012. As a rookie, Griffin led the league in yards per attempt (8.1), edging out Peyton Manning. He also tied Tom Brady for the league’s lowest interception rate (1.3 percent) and added 815 yards and seven touchdowns on the ground. He closed out the season with seven straight wins to lead Washington to the playoffs, and if it were not for Adrian Peterson’s incredible 2,097-yard season, Griffin might have had a legitimate case for MVP.Griffin took huge steps backward in 2013 and 2014 and then got benched for a year. But if the 2016 version of RGIII can be three-quarters the player he was in 2012, he could be the best quarterback the Browns have had in years. It’s something to hope for, at least.VIDEO: How one spurned Rams fan found a new team Our preseason Elo projections are a little less bullish, putting Pittsburgh as the seventh-most-likely Super Bowl winner. The Steelers could improve from last season just by having Roethlisberger for all 16 games, but they’re without their starting running back for three games, plus receiver Martavis Bryant has been suspended for the year and veteran tight end Heath Miller retired. Bryant and Miller combined for 1,300 receiving yards in 2015.Cincinnati BengalsThere are a lot of ways an NFL franchise can be depressing. The Bills lost four straight Super Bowls. The Browns and Lions have never made it to one. And the Cincinnati Bengals are winless in their last seven playoff games, wasting some of the best seasons in the franchise’s history.Last year was especially brutal. The Bengals looked outstanding at the start, going 8-0 with wins over the Chiefs, Seahawks and Steelers. After their Week 9 victory over the Browns, the Bengals hit a new franchise Elo high of 1672. (This was only good for third-best Elo in the NFL at that moment, which itself is pretty depressing, if you think about it). They finished at 12-4 with a +140 point differential — the best regular season in franchise history — but they lost starting QB Andy Dalton to injury in Week 14.Everyone knew what was coming next. Like clockwork, the Bengals lost their Wild Card game for a fifth straight year. To refresh your memory on the specifics, Cincinnati trailed 15-0 entering the fourth quarter, pulled ahead 16-15, and and then committed not one but two egregious personal fouls to hand Pittsburgh a game-winning field goal. Cincinnati will carry over a lot of its talent from 2015, but very little pride.Baltimore RavensWhat happened to the Ravens? The 2014 squad was the 7th-best in the NFL per our final pre-Super Bowl Elo ratings, after a 10-6 season that ended at the hands of eventual champion New England. Going into 2015, we projected Baltimore to win 9.3 games, with a 55 percent chance of making the playoffs. They went 5-11. 1DallasNFC East9.84-5.8 read more

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Buckeyes Matta in favor of tournament expansion

Buckeyes Matta in favor of tournament expansion

28 September 0

You can never have too much of a good thing. Just ask the NCAA.Although the NCAA Men’s Basketball Tournament is one of the more popular sporting events in the country, coaches, school presidents and athletic directors from around the nation met last week to discuss a possible change. The discussions focused on a potential increase of the tournament from 65 to as many as 96 teams.A final decision was not made, nor is it expected to be anytime soon.The possible expansion has received mixed reviews throughout the country, but Ohio State coach Thad Matta said he loves the idea.“I think it would be excellent, I really do,” Matta said. “I think that you look at what used to be 16 [teams] and then I think they took it to 24 then to 32, 48 and 64. I think that that would be a great thing.”Some speculate that the longer list of tournament invitees would give teams from mid-major conferences a better chance to play in the postseason. It is possible that the extra round could serve as a play-in round for smaller schools that would otherwise be denied the opportunity.Others, however, suggest that the extra round would be filled with more teams from the power conferences, such as the Big Ten. It is thought that teams that finish at or near .500 in their conference could get the nod over the smaller schools to fill the additional spots.Matta made it very clear which side of the argument he supports.“I’d say the Big Ten,” Matta said when asked whether he’d like to see teams from his own conference or mid-major conferences make the tournament. “I know this [conference] is hard. I know what it takes to go through a stretch like we do of 18 Big Ten games.”One concern Matta did express with the expansion was a potential decreased interest in the regular season — games that the coach said are what makes college basketball so great.“The greatest thing I ever heard was from John Wooden and he said, ‘People put too much emphasis on the last game of the year,’” Matta said. “There is so much excitement along the way and I think that we lose the sight of what’s happening now as it’s all geared toward getting into the NCAA Tournament. There is so much great basketball to be played in the month of February and even in early March.”A possible solution to Matta’s problem would be an increase in high-profile, out-of-conference matchups, a change that he said would be rather easy.“[A larger tournament] allows you to be a little more risky in your non-conference schedule,” he said. “We’ve [played] Tennessee, we’ve done Florida and we’ve done LSU, but you can get out and do those things a little bit better and know that you’re going to be rewarded.”Even given his concern, Matta was clear that he felt an expanded tournament would be in the best interest of college basketball. There are some, like OSU junior David Lighty, who see the situation a little differently.Lighty doesn’t see a need for a change, but unlike his coach who seemed concerned about bettering the entire sport, his opinion was based on more selfish reasoning.“I like it how it is,” Lighty said. “As long as we’re in it.” read more

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Ohio States Jaamal Berry named suspect in alleged assault Gene Smith aware

Ohio States Jaamal Berry named suspect in alleged assault Gene Smith aware

28 September 0

Ohio State football player Jaamal Berry has been named a suspect in an alleged assault that occurred Friday morning, according to a report from the Columbus Police Department. It is the second incident involving Berry allegedly assaulting another individual in less than a month.The latest incident occurred at 2:20 a.m. Friday on Vine Street, behind North Market, and involved a 21-year-old non-OSU student. The victim was “struck in the face with a closed fist,” according to the Columbus police report.Berry, a redshirt sophomore running back, was with another African-American male and was allegedly yelling at the victim and his friend, after the victim was struck by a car. The victim, who The Lantern has chosen not to name at this time, said that Berry and his friend were yelling vulgar remarks at him. After asking why they were yelling, the victim said that Berry crossed the street and punched his friend, and then punched him in the face with a closed fist.Berry was later identified by a witness, and the alleged victim said he confirmed Berry’s identity when shown a picture by police.The victim’s mother, who requested anonymity, said she spoke with Gene Smith, OSU athletic director, about the incident on Friday afternoon.Smith said that the athletic department is aware that Berry might have been involved in an altercation.“We have not been informed by anyone else that charges have been filed,” Smith told The Lantern Monday. “If Jaamal is charged, he will be suspended pending the outcome of the case.”Berry and other witnesses involved did not immediately respond to The Lantern‘s requests for comment.On Sept. 28, Berry was involved in what an OSU police report described as an “assault” on another student. Berry was admitted and released from the OSU Medical Center and no charges were filed. read more

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Analysis Ohio State cannot afford to lose rivalry game to Michigan

Analysis Ohio State cannot afford to lose rivalry game to Michigan

28 September 0

Ohio State redshirt senior quarterback J.T. Barrett (16) calls out a play in the Ohio State-Maryland game on Oct. 7. Ohio State won 62-14. Credit: Jack Westerheide | Photo EditorRedshirt senior linebacker Chris Worley equates Ohio State’s game against Michigan to laws. “You don’t break that law,” he said. “You better beat The Team Up North.”Since Worley arrived on campus for his first season, he has abided by that law. The Buckeyes have defeated the Wolverines the last five seasons, and Ohio State opened as 13-point favorites to extend the streak to six victories.Having knocked off Michigan State 48-3 two weeks ago and Illinois 52-14 last weekend, No. 9 Ohio State enters Saturday’s game with hefty momentum. No. 24 Michigan, on the other hand, limps into the matchup coming off a 24-10 loss to No. 5 Wisconsin. The Wolverines also lost to the Spartans and Penn State earlier in the season, both teams Ohio State defeated.The Buckeyes hold many advantages, enough to quell most concerns about the matchup. Yet, due to Ohio State’s turbulent two-loss season, pressure on the Buckeyes to win has not dipped, and might have intensified. There’s never an optimal time to lose to a rival. Urban Meyer hasn’t lost to Michigan as Ohio State’s head coach, but this would be especially poor timing for his first.With losses to Oklahoma and Iowa, the Buckeyes already sit in uncharted territory. No two-loss team has made the College Football Playoff since its inception in 2014. Just two weeks ago after a 55-24 loss to Iowa, Ohio State’s playoff hopes seemed dashed. But now it seems increasingly likely that if the Buckeyes defeat Michigan and take down Wisconsin in the Big Ten championship, they will earn a playoff berth.Much remains on the line for Ohio State beyond just postseason action.The veteran-laden roster contains 19 seniors, including quarterback J.T. Barrett, who will look to become the first signal-caller to win the matchup in four straight seasons. Last year, the Buckeyes made the playoff in spite of their youth and inexperience, which showed up in the 31-0 loss to Clemson in the Fiesta Bowl.This season, Ohio State was supposed to take advantage of seniors such as Barrett, center Billy Price, defensive end Tyquan Lewis and left tackle Jamarco Jones pairing with a talented crop of underclassmen, including running backs Mike Weber and J.K. Dobbins, defensive end Nick Bosa, defensive tackle Dre’Mont Jones and others. But the Buckeyes have not reached their potential this season. Ohio State always expects to win every game, but a loss to Oklahoma was far from the end of the world. Meyer’s team overcame a loss to Penn State the prior season and made the playoff. But a loss to Iowa, a clearly inferior group? That sent shockwaves through a fan base that expects nothing less than a playoff appearance.Imagine the reaction if Ohio State lost to Michigan. Sure, the Wolverines have not taken down the Buckeyes since 2011 and have defeated their rivals just once in the last 13 matchups, but fans live in the present. A three-loss regular season would send Ohio State to the Big Ten championship without playoff hopes and a lesser bowl appearance could bring out the worst in the fan base.It might not get better for the Buckeyes next season.A new quarterback combined with an exodus of talent on both the offensive and defensive lines leads to a question-filled 2018 Ohio State season. Michigan, on the other hand, will return a majority of its starters and will pose a much greater threat to next year’s youthful Buckeyes.Barrett’s legacy also relies on the game. He can either make history with a fourth win, or will lose his third game of the season. Of course, the hate he would get would not be fair. Not a single quarterback on either side has beaten his opponent in the game four times. But Barrett would be viewed as someone who continually can’t win big games.He knows he will not be welcomed with grace in Ann Arbor, Michigan, but said he embraces the negative reaction. “I don’t think it’s going to be pleasant, I’m pretty sure they’re going to hate me,” Barrett said. “Got to learn to love the hate. I like being hated sometimes. I don’t mind it. They hate us anyway.”Meyer said the history of the game has showed both teams play their best against each other. Though Michigan has yet to win a game against a team with a winning record, Meyer expects the Wolverines to offer staunch opposition.Ohio State seemed to lose its playoff hopes after the loss to Iowa. But reclaiming them only to lose to a lesser Michigan team would be a worst-case scenario for the Buckeyes. read more

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Mens Lacrosse Jack Jasinski finds path to becoming crucial player for Ohio

Mens Lacrosse Jack Jasinski finds path to becoming crucial player for Ohio

28 September 0

Then-sophomore attackman Jack Jasinski heads for the goal in the fourth quarter during the first round of the NCAA tournament against Loyola Maryland on May 14, 2017. Credit: Sheridan Hendrix | Former Oller ReporterOhio State lacrosse senior midfielder Jack Jasinski is currently the top point scorer for the Buckeyes, but the Alabama native is focused on helping his teammates and changing the way people see lacrosse in his home state.Jasinski grew up in Birmingham, an area not known for lacrosse the way it is for football or basketball. His high school days weren’t normal due to him taking up the sport.“It was very, very different. I think there are only 13 high school teams in the whole state for lacrosse,” Jasinski said.Jasinski found lacrosse through his older brother, who decided to take up the sport while Jasinski was in the eighth grade. He was focused on baseball at the time, but decided to give lacrosse a chance. “I didn’t expect it,” Jasinski said. “I was like, ‘I’ll probably still play baseball,’ and I ended [up] playing lacrosse, and I’ve pretty much never looked back.”Now, as the top scorer for the Buckeyes with 26 points, Jasinski has become one of the most important players on the No. 4-ranked lacrosse team.“He’s a guy that just continues to get better and better,” Ohio State head coach Nick Myers said.Jasinski is usually one of the shortest players each time he takes the field, standing at 5 feet 7 inches, but his mentality has helped make him the top scorer of the only undefeated team left in the Top 25. “I’ve always had a chip on my shoulder, just being from Alabama, just being from a small area,” Jasinski said.His development has never been more evident than during this season. Jasinski broke onto the scene after an impressive junior season that was enough for him to be named on the Big Ten Watch List.“When he got here, he was probably a little bit more raw than not,” Myers said. “But I think he’s really developed well into a lacrosse player.”Not only has Jasinski made a difference to the stat sheet, he has also embraced the role of a leader that comes with being a senior.Hei is one of seven seniors on the Ohio State roster that is making team culture a priority.Despite not being named a captain, Jasinski still takes on that role and shows his support for the players named captains.“The guys that were selected captains were selected because they’re really good leaders,” Jasinski said. ”I have nothing but support and praise. They’ve done a great job this year.”Off the field, Jasinski took a service trip this past summer to help people in Puerto Rico.“I went down there and was blown away, their culture there, the positivity they bring, they had gone through a lot in the past 24 months with hurricanes,” Jasinski said. “It gives you a good perspective like, ‘You know what? You don’t really have a lot to complain about here.’”During the trip, Jasinski went to a village where it was difficult for the residents to get supplies in order to fix the houses affected by the hurricanes. He helped paint houses, give supplies, meet with local community members and hand out shoes to the kids who didn’t have any.The senior midfielder credits that trip to Puerto Rico for changing him as a teammate and reminding himself that things could be much worse. In the wake of graduation, Jasinski’s hopes to keep playing lacrosse as long as he can.“If I get the opportunity, that’d be awesome,” Jasinski said.With the Dallas Rattlers taking Jasinski with the 37th pick in the Major League Lacrosse draft, it looks like the undersized player from Alabama will get his opportunity. read more

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Early bed time could be warning sign for heart problems in men

Early bed time could be warning sign for heart problems in men

25 September 0

first_img Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings. While early nights were linked with higher blood pressure, getting more sleep was unlikely to do anything to help the condition, they cautioned. Despite going to bed earlier, those with high blood pressure managed no more sleep overall – and scored significantly worse in tools used to measure the quality of slumber. On average, those with high blood pressure – also called hypertension – scored 5.3 in assessments, where a score of five or more indicted poor sleep quality. Among those with normal blood pressure, the score was 4.7, according to the study findings, presented at the European Society of Cardiology, in Rome. Men who want an early night could be showing a warning sign of heart problems, medics have warned.A study of 2,400 adults found that among men, bed times were significantly earlier among those suffering from high blood pressure.On average, those with the condition – one of the key risks for heart disease – retired for the night 18 minutes earlier than those without it.And once they got to bed, those with high blood pressure were significantly more likely to spent the night tossing and turning, the Japanese study found. Researchers said the desire to turn in early could be a clue to health problems which might otherwise be missed. Lead researcher Dr Nobuo Sasaki, from Hiroshima University, said: “Early bed times were associated with hypertension independent of anything else.”Researchers said those with high blood pressure might tend to prefer earlier nights because their underlying health was worse, making them more tired. But they said it was also possible that the condition could alter the body clock, causing “abnormal circadian rhythms” which left them exhausted in the evenings, but likely to lie awake at night. The study, of adults aged between 40 and 60, showed that the average bed time of those with high blood pressure was  11.10pm, while for those with normal pressure it was  11.28pm.British experts said anyone with concerns about blood pressure should get it checked.Both groups slept for an average of 6.2 hours – though the group with high blood pressure lay awake for longer.  Professor Jeremy Pearson, Associate Medical Director at the British Heart Foundation, said: “People often have raised blood pressure without knowing it, but it is unlikely that a tendency to go to bed early is the best way to detect this – you should check your blood pressure regularly and see your GP if you are concerned.”last_img read more

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Mothers plea over schoolboy hounded to death by trolls who targeted teen

Mothers plea over schoolboy hounded to death by trolls who targeted teen

25 September 0

first_img Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings. I want to raise awareness because we all have a collective responsibility to prevent other young lives being lostLucy Alexander A grieving mum has written a heartbreaking open letter to the bullies who drove her son to suicide – after he was teased because he was not allowed to play Call of Duty.Felix Alexander, 17, died under the wheels of a train earlier this year after suffering seven years of abuse.The teenager told his parents he was getting the bus to school but instead went to the railway tracks and stepped in front of an oncoming train.He was killed instantly when he was struck near his home in Worcester, on the morning of April 27 this year.An inquest concluded Felix had committed suicide after suffering years of bullying, firstly in the playground and then by online trolls. One website he was targeted on was Ask.fm, which has been linked to seven teenage suicides.His bullying began in 2009 following a playground argument about violent video game Call of Duty: Modern Warfare 2.The 18-rated game had just been released but Felix, then aged 10, was branded a “p—-” by classmates at school in Worcester after he admitted his parents had banned him from playing it.Felix moved to a different school last September but the bullying continued until he was unable to cope any longer.His mother Lucy, 51, has now written an open letter to her son’s bullies, as well as to schools and parents, explaining the torment Felix suffered. It started with social isolation when he was around ten. He didn’t get invited to parties and wasn’t included in weekend activitiesLucy Alexander It says: “I write this letter not for sympathy, but because there are so many more children like Felix who are struggling.”His confidence and self-esteem had been eroded over a long period of time by the bullying behaviour he experienced in secondary education.”It began with unkindness and social isolation and over the years, with the advent of social media, it became cruel and overwhelming. People who had never even met Felix were abusing him.”He was however so badly damaged by the abuse, isolation and unkindness he had experienced, that he was unable to see just how many people truly cared for him.” Felix Alexander, who took his own life after being bullied on social media “On the morning Felix died, we suspected something was wrong as we knew he hadn’t got to school. It wasn’t something we expected or were worried about.”We thought we were coming to the end of the tunnel, but obviously he couldn’t see the light. My other children were devastated to lose their brother. It was just horrendous.”Lucy, who also lives with husband Ratan, 55, an anaesthetist, is now fundraising for the Place2be charity, which offers mental health counselling to young people.She added: “I’ve gone back to work and I have superb friends and family who have helped me through it all.”My friend suggested the charity when Felix died as they help support children in schools who are going through a number of different types of trauma.”What appealed to me is that they believe in early intervention, which I believe is the key to stopping bullying early.”I want to raise awareness because we all have a collective responsibility to prevent other young lives being lost.” “Then the online abuse started when he was 14. It was initially via the website Ask.fm and then it escalated with basically every social media platform you could imagine.”It all started when people kept asking him why he didn’t have Call of Duty for the PlayStation.”He was 10 at the time, so why on earth would I let him play an 18-rated game that was full of violence?”One child even called him a ‘p—-‘ because he wasn’t allowed to play it. It was really silly comments like that which started the whole thing.”It spiralled from there and escalated into people who barely knew him joining in, and then he became Felix who everyone hated.”The damage had already been done. He couldn’t see a way to be happy.”He saw a psychologist when he was ten because he was in a very dark place. The bullying was poisonous.”He moved from his old school because he was very unhappy there and didn’t get the grades he needed to get into sixth form.”We don’t like to think that our children could be responsible for being cruel to another child, but I have been shocked by the ‘nice’ kids who were responsible in part for Felix’s anguish. “On several occasions we removed all form of social media from Felix as it was causing so much distress, but that just isolated him further. Felix Alexander, who took his own life after being bullied on social mediaCredit:PA Lucy, a sexual health nurse, who also has a daughter Charlotte, 22, and a son Ben, 21, said: “I wrote the letter as I want to educate our educators and to the bullies themselves so they can see the effect they have on the people they target.”Teachers need to be aware of the dangers of bullying and I want more help to be available.”I’m working with my son’s high school to raise awareness there, in the hope that teachers can receive further training.”He had been targeted for many, many years. It was generalised cruelty.”He was known as the most hated person in the year at school. “It started with social isolation when he was around ten. He didn’t get invited to parties and wasn’t included in weekend activities.last_img read more

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Army fitness slips but female soldiers close the gap on men

Army fitness slips but female soldiers close the gap on men

25 September 0

first_imgBritish soldiers This year in the Army, 18.8 per cent of women and 17.6 per cent of men failed one or more fitness tests The proportion of Army soldiers failing fitness tests has nearly doubled in three years amid concerns that personnel are losing focus because they are not being sent to war.Female troops are also narrowing the gap with their male counterparts after years of falling behind, The Telegraph can disclose.In 2013, 7,120 – or 9.6 per cent – of the 74,010 personnel who were made to complete personal fitness assessments failed at least one, according to figures released by the Ministry of Defence (MoD). He said: “They are responsible for ensuring that their men are battle fit.” Col Kemp added that it was possible commanders “might see there’s less incentive to push it” now troops are not regularly being sent into combat.He said: “When they are deploying on operations it’s a matter of life and death. They may think that’s not the case if they are not going on operations as much, which is of course a mistake because they could go at any time.”But an Army source said in recent years there had been a greater focus on testing soldiers’ fitness and the figures could reflect troops who had not been checked for some time, suddenly finding they were being tested. It is understood that if a test is failed, personnel are put on programmes aimed at helping improve their fitness levels. A MoD spokesman said: “Over 90 per cent of our personnel are fit to be deployed on operations around the world at any time. “All our forces are educated in nutrition, diet and exercise in order to maintain a healthy weight, and in some circumstances additional measures are considered in order to achieve this.” In comparison, between January and mid-September this year 11,300 troops – around 17.7 per cent – out of a possible 63,910 tested failed one or more.When looking at body mass index, more than 31,900 serving personnel were also found to be overweight or obese in the last three years. Last night, Army sources suggested that the failure rate may have dramatically increased due to fewer operational deployments.The MoD said basic fitness tests had not changed over the past three years. All Army personnel are required to take personal fitness assessments, including sit-ups, press-ups and a 1.5-mile run, twice a year.Three years ago, just over 12 per cent of females tested failed at least once, while 9.4 per cent of men did. This year, 18.8 per cent of women and 17.6 per cent of men failed one or more assessments.   When they are deploying on operations it’s a matter of life and deathCol Richard Kemp Knowing that they don’t have a deployment in the next six months to Afghanistan probably does lead to people taking their foot off the gasRecently retired Army officer One recently retired Army officer suggested that soldiers were finding it more difficult to focus on keeping fit because they knew they were not going on operations.He said: “Operations sharpen the mind and focus your efforts on keeping fit – the prospect of going to Afghanistan was certainly an incentive to get fit. After all you don’t want to let your mates down by being unfit and not prepared. Being shot at is hard enough when you’re fit, let alone when you’re out of shape.”He went on: “Not having that focus, knowing that they don’t have a deployment in the next six months to Afghanistan probably does lead to people taking their foot off the gas.“Former colleagues are also constantly telling me how the lads are bored and morale is suffering. Low morale tends to lead to a lack of motivation.”Col Richard Kemp, a former commander of British troops in Afghanistan, said commanders must take the responsibility for any lack of fitness. Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings.last_img read more

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Rolf Harris was seen as Mr Nice Guy but had a separate

Rolf Harris was seen as Mr Nice Guy but had a separate

25 September 0

first_imgNobody had any idea that Rolf Harris was this kind of man. We all thought he was Mr Nice Guy The woman, not at the time an in-patient at the hospital, recalled feeling hot air from Harris’s nostrils and his beard tickling the back of her neck after he approached “from absolutely nowhere”.The alleged victim said she knew straight away it was Harris who had entered the room from his “unmistakeable voice”.At one point he tried to justify his behaviour saying “I’m just a touchy-feely sort of bloke”, later adding: “Don’t be like that, I’m only being friendly” when she asked him to stop, she said in a pre-recorded interview from July 2014.The complainant, who has two full-time carers, went on: “What annoyed me was that I just could not escape, and being blind I couldn’t always tell where he was.”I was completely and utterly trapped.” Rolf Harris appearing via videolink earlier in the trial Defence lawyer Stephen Vullo and prosecutor Jonathan Rees (right) earlier in the trialCredit:Elizabeth Cook /PA She went on: “No-one has ever behaved like that to me in my life and I have to say even my husband, at his most passionate times, never covered my body in a way that he has done.”Rolf Harris doesn’t ask permission he just grovels.”While being cross-examined from a wheelchair with her carer by her side, the witness recalled Harris teaching her how to play his didgeridoo in the 13x9ft room after the alleged assault.Mr Vullo asked her if she would agree the pair had what sounded like a “very happy” exchange following the alleged incident and she replied: “It may seem like that but I can assure you it was not the case.””Nobody had any idea that Rolf Harris was this kind of man. We all thought he was Mr Nice Guy,” she went on as Harris cradled his head.Asked by Mr Vullo why she had not come forward until the publicity of the first trial she said: “I was just so amazed because Rolf Harris was somebody I had grown up with and we loved it. He was part of our culture and I used to love listening to him on the television.”The complainant said she did not report the incident or call the police that day because she did not think anybody would believe her allegations against “an extremely popular man”. Wearing a black suit and black and white tie Harris, who appeared by video-link, is serving a sentence at Stafford Prison for a series of offences of indecent assault carried out on four female victims.He maintains his innocence, prosecutor Jonathan Rees said, and has pleaded not guilty to a further seven counts of indecent assault and one alternative charge of sexual assault.Each of the new alleged victims contacted the police or the NSPCC in the wake of the publicity surrounding the first trial, the prosecutor said.She continued: “One (complainant) later described him as an octopus.”I thought ‘that’s exactly what it felt like with his arms and fingers spread as far as he could spread them’.Her voice breaking, she continued: “The way he took advantage over someone that was totally blind, virtually stuck in terms of mobility … it’s absolutely appalling. In my opinion it’s as degrading as it gets.” Rolf Harris appearing via videolink earlier in the trialCredit:Elizabeth Cook/PA Rolf Harris was seen as “Mr Nice Guy” but he had a “separate identity” as a paedophile, an alleged victim of the entertainer has claimed in court.The former television presenter preyed on a blind, disabled woman like a “hawk pouncing on his prey”, leaving her “completely and utterly trapped”, his trial heard.Disabled since her premature birth, the complainant was totally blind and had to walk with sticks when she was allegedly groped by Harris at Moorfields Eye Hospital in London in 1977, Southwark Crown Court heard. Rolf Harris in 2014Credit:Laura Dale /PA Defence lawyer Stephen Vullo and prosecutor Jonathan Rees (right) earlier in the trial She said when Harris was referred to as a “predator” in his first trial she recalled he had acted similarly with her.She said of the encounter: “It was like a hawk pouncing on his prey and that is what he did to me.””I thought I was the only one but he did it to so many and that’s what hurt me so much,” she continued.Raising her voice she said: “He only has himself to blame and what I wish he would do is apologise to all his victims, me being one of them.”She admitted having a difficult financial situation but denied she was making the allegations in the hope of getting some of Harris’s money.Harris denies seven counts of indecent assault and one count of sexual assault against seven complainants who were contacted by police and the NSPCC in the wake of publicity surrounding his first trial.  The case was adjourned until Tuesday.  Rolf Harris in 2014 Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings.last_img read more

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Cambridgeeducated law lecturer leaves brother homeless following £750000 legal battle to sell

Cambridgeeducated law lecturer leaves brother homeless following £750000 legal battle to sell

25 September 0

first_imgThe £750k Hampstead flat at the centre of the court battleCredit:Champion News Service Ruling in Filip’s favour yesterday at Central London County Court, Judge Berkley told the supermarket guard that he and his family must comply with his brother’s demands, and vacate the property within two months. However, the legal challenge has left Nikola facing legal costs amounting to more than £200,000. According to Judge Berkley, Filip had complied with his “duty of candour” and was reasonable in expecting his brother to take independent legal advice before signing the document. The court heard that the brothers were given the money they bought the flat with by their mother, Katarina, following the death of their father.The lives of the two siblings have taken very different directions: Filip, the brighter of the pair, is a practicing lawyer, having enrolled on a masters course at Cambridge University and Harvard. He now lectures at the University of Southampton in maritime law.Whilst Nikola viewed the flat as a secure home, Filip’s “primary” reason for buying it was to develop a number of garages attached to the building. The £750k Hampstead flat at the centre of the court battle “I find that Filip chose not to explain the detail of the express power of sale and in particular the fact that either party could elect to sell the property against the other’s wishes after a year.””I cannot find anything that Filip did wrong. It is very unfair and inequitable to say that Filip asserted undue influence in anything that he did,” he added.”Nikola assumed it would be his home for as long as he wanted to stay there, but that could not mean that Filip’s interest would simply lie languishing.”Judge Berkley issued an order for sale of the flat, authorising marketing for sale to commence within one month in order to provide adequate time for Nikola to vacate the property. He also agreed to consider a written plea for a reduction of Nikola’s legal costs.  However, unknown to Nikola, the deed also included a clause stating that either brother was entitled to sell the flat a year after its purchase. Representing the oldest sibling, Martin Young told the court that the pair had maintained a “good relationship” prior to 2014, but had fallen out after Nikola realised the “devastating” impact the deed would have on his family. “What Nikola wanted all along was to keep the home that he thought would be his for as long as he wanted it,” Mr Young said.”Filip knew that Nikola was relying on him to know the nature of the document he was signing. He thought the flat was going to buy a home for him and his family for the foreseeable future.” He added that Filip owned to other properties in Cambridge and Southampton, but that Nikola’s family now had no other avenue to turn to. Concluding, Judge Berkley said: “The parties fell out in September 2014, Filip says because Nikola was not making enough effort to find a ‘proper ‘ job and showed no signs of moving out.””Nikola is not as dynamic as Filip and it would have been plain that he was content to live in the flat…he thought the flat was going to be a home for him and his family for the foreseeable future. Nikola Saranovic and his wife Bojana have lost their home and now face a £200,000 legal bill after losing a court battle with his younger brother A Cambridge-educated law lecturer has left his brother homeless – and facing a £200,000 legal bill – after winning a court battle to sell a £750,000 flat bought by the pair with money left to them by their mother.Legal expert Filip Saranovic, 29, and his older brother, Nikola Saranovic, a security guard at Tesco, bought the flat in Hampstead, London, in June 2014 with cash given to them both by their mother.”Naive” supermarket worker Nikola, 41, his wife Bojana and their four-year-old daughter, simply viewed the flat as “a home for the family for the foreseeable future,” Central London County Court heard.However, Filip, who owns two other flats, regarded his brother as “lazy” and had other ideas, wanting the property to be sold in order to finance another development project.Unknown to Nikola, he signed a legal document during a discussion held in a local Costa coffee shop which granted his younger brother Filip the power to place the property on sale and evict his family following completion. When Nikola realised what had happened, a court battle ensued, during which Judge Michael Berkley found that Nikola “had no express knowledge” of the sale clause, and had “relied on” Filip “to explain that important part of the transaction to him.” Prior to the purchase of the Hampstead property, Filip had a document drawn up, stating that his brother could live in the flat rent free and that his own share of the flat would be capped at £367,500. Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings. But he went on to find that Filip had “done nothing wrong” and that Nikola hadn’t taken enough care over what he was signing. Nikola Saranovic and his wife Bojana have lost their home and now face a £200,000 legal bill after losing a court battle with his younger brotherlast_img read more

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Paramedic attacked with noxious liquid when she is flagged down by gang on

Paramedic attacked with noxious liquid when she is flagged down by gang on

25 September 0

first_imgPeter Rhodes, assistant director of operations at LAS, said: “I am appalled by this attack on our paramedic who stopped to help these men who she believed were in trouble, but instead they assaulted her in a premeditated attack, not only harming her but delaying treatment to a potentially critically ill patient.  “We have reported this incident to the police and will do everything in our power to make sure those responsible are identified and convicted for this senseless attack.”   The LAS said that all frontline ambulance crews in London are being reminded of the need to be cautious when flagged down by anyone requesting help or assistance. One of the men then threw liquid out of a plastic bottle at her, which she feared was acid after a spate of attacks across London.Reliving her ordeal, the woman said: “It was horrible. I didn’t know what was going to happen to me.  “It all happened very quickly – one of them threw liquid out of a plastic bottle at me. The window was only open a few inches but the liquid went on my face, neck and chest. He was wearing latex gloves, so my first thought was, is this acid?”The liquid was not acid, but was what the LAS described as a “noxious substance” that caused irritation to the paramedic, who was taken to hospital but later discharged.   A large emergency response following an acid attack in London on July 13Credit:Reuters “It was terrifying,” she added. “This was so cowardly. It is my job to help people. I was on my way to help a patient and I stopped because I am caring and I thought they needed my help. “They have taken away my trust. What they’ve done is horrific in so many ways. “It was premeditated and it delayed a patient getting treatment. It took a paramedic off the road that night. And yet if one my attackers were hurt, I would still treat them because that is the job.”   We’re working with @metpoliceuk & will do everything in our power to ensure the attackers are identified & convicted https://t.co/uS3eqwIi9S https://t.co/eBB2mjLZyg— London Ambulance (@Ldn_Ambulance) July 18, 2017 Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings. A large emergency response following an acid attack in London on July 13 They have taken away my trust. What they’ve done is horrific in so many waysparamedic attacked in Tottenham Hale A paramedic feared she was being sprayed with acid when she was flagged down by three attackers while answering a 999 call.The 32-year-old woman had a “noxious substance” thrown at her as she responded to an emergency call about a patient suffering from chest pain.London Ambulance Service (LAS) said the trio appeared to be in distress in Tottenham Hale, north London, when they flagged her down at about 1.30am on Sunday.But as the lone female paramedic, who did not want to be named, stopped to ask the men if they were OK, they pulled up bandanas to cover their faces. Mr Rhodes added: “While this type of situation is thankfully very rare, we are reminding medics they should be mindful of the potential risk and be cautious in similar situations.  “Naturally we are doing everything we can to support the paramedic who is understandably distressed by this incident. We encourage our staff to report violent incidents and do everything we can to give our crews a sense of safety at work”  The attack comes days after a spate of moped acid attacks in less than 90 minutes in London. Six victims, all men on bikes, were allegedly sprayed in the face with a noxious liquid on July 13. Conservative and Labour MPs have added their weight to calls for the Government to get tough on acid attacks.MPs backed tougher sentences as well as a crackdown on sales and a new criminal offence for those carrying sulphuric acid.Labour former minister Stephen Timms, who led a Commons debate on the issue, said that acid is becoming a “preferred weapon for gangs carrying out robberies”.Home Secretary Amber Rudd has already indicated acid attack convictions could soon carry life sentences as part of a crackdown on corrosive substances unveiled by the Government, which includes a review of existing measures.last_img read more

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Worlds first talking killer whale Wikie the orca learns to say hello

Worlds first talking killer whale Wikie the orca learns to say hello

25 September 0

first_imgWhales are known for their impressive communications skills which allow pods to ‘talk’ to each other through complex clicks and singing, even when they are 100 miles apart.But a new experiment has shown the mammals are also apparently capable of mimicking human speech, a feat that was previously believed to be limited to primates, birds, elephants, dolphins and seals.Scientists say they have recorded a killer whale named Wikie repeating the words ‘hello’ and ‘bye bye’, counting up to three, and even saying the name of her trainer ‘Amy.’The 14-year-old orca lives in Marineland at Antibes, France, and is the first in the world ever recorded by scientists allegedly saying human words.The achievement is even more remarkable because whales do not have the same vocal ability as humans having evolved to make their own sounds underwater. While humans use the larynx to speak, whales produce sounds through their nasal passages using bursts of air. An orca whale in the wild  An orca whale in the wild  Whales are known to communicate over one hundred miles and have their own dialect and cultures  The researchers concluded: “In sum, Wikie made recognizable copies of the demonstrated sound judged in real time by two observers, Wikie’s trainer and one experimenter, later confirmed by both after listening to the recordings.“The subject’s matching accuracy is all the more remarkable as she was able to accomplish it in response to sounds presented in-air and not in-water, the species’ usual medium for acoustic communication.“It is conceivable that our data represent a conservative estimate of the killer whale’s capacity for vocal imitation.”The whale words were also analysed in waveform and matched the human words when the acoustical recordings were compared.Dr Alex Thornton, senior lecturer in cognitive evolution at the University of Exeter, said: “We still don’t fully understand why some animals learn to mimic, but there are a few possibilities.“In some cases, mimicking might be deceptive. Fork-tailed drongos in the Kalahari, for instance, copy meerkat alarm calls so that the meerkats drop their food in alarm and the drongo can swoop in and steal it.“In other cases, copying sounds might be a way of showing off to potential mates. If a male is good at learning to make lots of different noises, females might use this as an indication that they are also good at learning to find food and feed offspring. “Finally, in some cases copying sounds might help to identify an individual as a member of a group. Some whales, for example, learn their calls from one another and so have local vocal dialects that mark them out as members of their social group.” Recently scientists have discovered that whales have different ‘accents’ or ‘cultures’ and the new study suggests that those differences are picked up when young through imitation of adults, in a similar way to how children learn to speak through copying.Writing in Proceedings of the Royal Society B, José Abramson of the Complutense University of Madrid, said: “Vocal imitation is a hallmark of human spoken language, which, along with other advanced cognitive skills, has fuelled the evolution of human culture. Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings. “We found that the subject made recognizable copies of all familiar and novel and human sounds tested and did so relatively quickly, most during the first 10 trials and three in the first attempt.“Our results lend support to the hypothesis that the vocal variants observed in natural populations of this species can be socially learned by imitation.” Whales are known to communicate over one hundred miles and have their own dialect and cultures Credit:AP Photo/Miami Seaquarium In the wild, killer whales live in pods and each has its own dialect, which includes calls that are completely unique to themselves. Some clicks are even thought to represent names. But it was unclear where that knowledge came from.Previously killer whales have been observed mimicking the barks of sea lions and the whistles of sea dolphins and beluga whales have been filmed apparently imitating humans, but until now no controlled experiments have been carried out to verify the reports.In the new trial, Wikie was trained to understand a ‘copy’ signal then invited to repeat 11 completely new sounds given by her trainer. They included words and also noises such as an elephant call, a wolf howl and a creaking door.Wikie was given a fish or an affectionate pat when she achieved the sound to reinforce the learning. Six judges were then asked to rate whether the vocalisation matched the original word or noise.last_img read more

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Sat nav rip off as owners of modern cars face annual £300

Sat nav rip off as owners of modern cars face annual £300

25 September 0

first_imgAs modern cars become festooned with evermore gadgets, the in-built sat nav is now a standard fixture.However, as they become indispensable for driving, many motorists may not realise they are far from inexpensive. Indeed, owners face unforeseen charges down the line should they wish to have the most up-to-date road maps on their device.An investigation by Auto Express magazine found that the cost of updating the in-built sat nav system varies by hundreds of pounds, depending on the make, model and age of your car, even though most get the mapping software from the same provider.Owners of older Jaguar XFs pay up to £316 for sat nav updates, while those for Ford cars vary from £81.90 to £159, depending on model and age, the research found, with those driving earlier editions paying most.Subaru vehicles operating on an old system face an update cost of £300, while the charge for newer Subarus with SD-card sat navs is £100 after the three free updates run out. Car manufacturers claim the fees are often associated with the software packages they pay for as well as the amount of labour that is involved in updating a sat nav.Drivers hoping to use their mobile phone GPS as a short cut should beware that they may be prosecuted if caught driving while on the phone.HERE Technologies, a data provider, said that while brands receive regular map updates, “it’s up to manufacturers to choose the frequency of updates for individual models and whether to offer them for free”.      Many car firms charges drivers down the road to update their built-in sat navs Nissan, which charges up to £196 ­depending on the model, says its latest European mapping software adds 1,439,809km of roads, new street names, plus better junction information, while drivers of new Fords get free updates for seven years. Owners of new cars often benefit from free updates, with makers such as Volvo and Volkswagen now including lifetime updates on their latest models.Drivers of older Volvo models have to cough up £125 to bring sat nav maps up to date. However, not all car-makers have adopted this policy. Audi will give five free updates to owners of vehicles with its Navigation Plus systems, after which they will be charged – albeit the fee has yet to be determined. Many car firms charges drivers down the road to update their built-in sat navsCredit:Alamy Stock Photo Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings.last_img read more

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Patients should be charged for GP and hospital visits to fund NHS

Patients should be charged for GP and hospital visits to fund NHS

25 September 0

Earlier this month an Ipsos Mori poll of more than 1,000 adults found 71 per cent supported the idea of charges for missed GP and hospital appointments. And 47 per cent backed “charging patients who have diseases and illnesses which are caused in some way by their lifestyle”. In total, 47 per cent of those surveyed backed this, the poll commissioned by the NHS Confederation found. Both were more popular than increases in national insurance, which won support from 45 per cent of those polled, or increases in tax, which 42 per cent backed. Professor Helen Stokes-Lampard, Chairman of the Royal College of GPs, said: “Charging patients for GP appointments would go against one of the founding principles of the NHS, that care is free at the point of need. “It risks deterring patients from seeking medical help in the early stages of illness, when they can be dealt with cost-effectively and efficiently in primary care, rather than requiring expensive specialist care in hospitals, and it is bound to negatively affect our vulnerable patients, who are less able to pay for healthcare, most,” she said. Similar motions are proposed by committees from Buckinghamshire, Scunthorpe and Worcestershire and Herefordshire, which said “denial of NHS healthcare is now so endemic, that it has become regrettably necessary to consider co-payments for NHS clinical services to re-establish adequate provision”.Cancer specialist Prof Karol Sikora said he was strongly in favour of co-payments, saying they encouraged people to take more responsibility for their health. “Every other aspect of life you pay for – whether it’s your holiday, your home, your car or whether or not your children go to private school,” he said.Prof Sikora said the NHS should still provide a decent standard of care for free, with top-ups used to speed access for operations, GP appointments and expensive drugs.”We have always talked about this but Governments of both left and right have avoided it because they thought they would lose votes. I don’t think they will,” he said. “I hope the BMA votes in favour of this,” said Prof Sikora, Dean of Buckinghamshire Medical School.”They voted against the NHS at the start – they’re not all communists.”But Dr Richard Vautrey, chairman of the BMA’s GP committee, said he did not believe most of the union’s members would support the move.”I would be very surprised if it is passed but the BMA is a democratic organisation and we will discuss the arguments,” he said.”This is an issue that has come up before and it is something we debate but the consensus has always been that the best way to fund the NHS is through general taxation.”Clearly when there is a lack of investment as we have seen people are going to start looking round for alternatives,” the GP added.Rachel Power, chief executive of the Patients Association said charges were not the way forward. “Funding the NHS through taxation spreads the risk of ill health across the population, and means that everyone can access care when they need it. “Charges, by contrast, would lead to well-off patients spending more on their care, and less well-off people being excluded, and suffering worse health as a result – it’s both inequitable and inefficient,” she said. A patient is given a vaccination by a doctor (stock image) A patient is given a vaccination by a doctor (stock image)Credit:Rex Patients should be charged for GP and hospital visits, leading doctors say.The British Medical Association (BMA) will vote next week on whether to lobby the Government to introduce alternative ways to fund the NHS.The radical move, which would end the principle of an NHS free at the point of delivery, will be discussed at the BMA’s annual conference on Monday.Those backing the proposal say charges are preferable to the “covert rationing” of healthcare which they say has become endemic.And they said fees to see doctors would discourage people with minor ailments from clogging up GP surgeries.A number of doctors have previously called for the introduction of a £25 fee to see GPs, but so far the BMA has not endorsed the policy.Earlier this year polling of GPs found eight in 10 were in favour of charges for some services. Mike Forster, lay secretary for Gloucestershire local medical committee (LMC) said the aim of the motion was to reduce pressure on the NHS, by encouraging patients to take more responsibility.”There is an enormous amount of demand in general practice. We are just putting a shot across the bow saying is this something to be considered for ameliorating the deluge of patients going through general practice doors who might possibly think twice about doing it,” he said. Too many patients were visiting GPs when they would have recovered after a few days rest, or could have seen a pharmacist, he said.Mr Forster said small fees might be enough to make patients think twice.”Think about plastic bags,” he said.”A 5p charge on them has vastly reduced the number of plastic bags people use. It might be that a couple of pounds – £5 maximum – would make people think ‘should I spend that on the GP or should I nip down to the pharmacy where you can get the medication anyway.’”Dr Dean Eggitt, chief executive of Doncaster LMC, also backed the idea of co-payments, saying the NHS should fund a more limited range of treatment, and patients who wanted more expected to pay “top up” fees.The GP said the announcement by Theresa May of an extra £20bn a year by 2024 was not sufficient, suggesting it was like expecting Harrods to work on an “Aldi” budget. “In reality, we either need to increase taxes dramatically, adopt a co-payment model – in effect cutting NHS services without a top up payment – or cut the quality and breath of NHS services for all – providing a service based upon need rather than want,” he said.The motion, proposed by Gloucestershire LMC for debate on Monday “calls on the BMA to encourage the Government to consider alternative means of funding the NHS” and says that “co-payments from patients should be considered.” Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? 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Fire chiefs warn homeowners to cover mirrors to reduce fire risk amid

Fire chiefs warn homeowners to cover mirrors to reduce fire risk amid

25 September 0

Fire services have also warned against discarding rubbish after camping, which poses a fire hazard Credit:Nigel French In the wake of 20 large fires that have hit the capital over the last two weeks, Tower Hamlets Homes has issued fire safety tips to householders.   John Kitchener, from Staffordshire Fire and Rescue Service, said: “Always keep reflective items such as mirrors away from direct sunlight.“Many people don’t realise that sunlight can be extremely powerful and if reflected off the surface of a mirror it can produce enough heat to ignite flammable materials.” Elsewhere, people have been advised not to leave bottles or glass in woodland areas, as there is an increased risk of a fire occurring where open ground temperatures are rising rapidly. The Fire Brigade Union found that fire incidents in England have increased by nine per cent for the year ending September 2017.There are fears that the number of these incidents will soar if members of the public are not more careful about their behaviour over the summer period.The London Fire Brigade also warned people to properly discard glass containers in bins, following a large grass fire near Heathrow Airport over the weekend, which required fifteen fire engines to put out.The warnings follow on from previous guidelines which advised homeowners to paint their property white to protect themselves from heat waves.Danielle Cotton, London fire brigade commissioner, said: “The ground is extremely dry at the moment and grassland and parks will act like a tinderbox when exposed to even the smallest of sparks.She added: “We are calling on the public to take steps to prevent grass fires: don’t drop cigarettes or matches on dry ground or out of car windows; don’t have barbeques on dry grass and don’t leave glass bottles out as they can concentrate the sun’s rays and start a blaze.” Fire services have also warned against discarding rubbish after camping, which poses a fire hazard  Homeowners must cover mirrors and move glass decorations to reduce the risk of house fires during the heatwave, fire chiefs have warned.Safety advice has been issued amid a continuing heatwave, urging residents not to leave items such as crystals, glass bottles or mirrors exposed as they could spark a blaze.The public have been advised to keep shaving and make-up mirrors out of direct sunlight as they can magnify the sun’s rays onto combustible items like blinds and curtains, causing them to ignite.It comes after a number of serious incidents have been reported to local authorities where property has been damaged after a reflective object has caused a fire.Fire services in Cambridgeshire, Dorset, Nottinghamshire, Merseyside and Staffordshire are among those who have recently issued guidance to prevent outbreaks.Residents’ associations have also notified their tenants to keep vigilant after a spate of fires in London during the heatwave. West Sussex Fire and Rescue Service have also alerted homeowners to the dangers of glass on window sills, after they were called to fight a blaze at a  bungalow in Bognor Regis.The home was gutted by a fire that was started due to sunlight shining through a glass ornament in a living room window. Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings. read more

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Soldier left with PTSD when RAF plane plummeted towards ground due to

Soldier left with PTSD when RAF plane plummeted towards ground due to

25 September 0

Flight Lieutenant Andrew Townshend outside of Bulford Military Court.Credit:Solent News & Photo Agency Flight Lieutenant Andrew Townshend outside of Bulford Military Court. Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings. A soldier left with Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) when an RAF plane plummeted towards the ground due to a ‘bored pilot’ has won hundreds of thousands of pounds compensation from the MoD.The long-serving soldier, who was convinced he was going to die after a terrifying mid-air ordeal in February 2014, has settled his claim against the Ministry of Defence.Soldier B, who joined the army in 2002, was one of 187 passengers in a RAF Voyager aircraft flying from RAF Brize Norton to Camp Bastion in Afghanistan.  At 33,000ft, the plane suddenly plummeted towards the ground. Some passengers were pinned to the ceiling due to the force of the descent.The accident was caused by the Pilot’s personal camera which he had brought on board and which became jammed in flight-deck equipment.But after Flt Lt Andrew Townshend regained control of the aircraft, he allegedly lied in both a technical log and service inquiry and insisted the incident had been caused by a technical fault. A Court Martial in 2017 heard Flt Lt Townshend was bored while flying from the UK to Camp Bastion in Afghanistan and “practicing long-exposure photography when his co-pilot left the cockpit to get a cup of tea”.The incident occurred on 9th February 2014 and, as a result of his injuries, Soldier B was discharged from the army last year.A spokesman for his legal team said: “This terrifying ordeal was entirely avoidable. Our client was convinced he was going to die – as were those around him.“As a result of the sudden and unexpected dive, Soldier B was thrown around and suffered soft tissue injuries.“More significantly, he suffered serious psychological injuries amounting to Post Traumatic Stress Disorder, a Depressive Episode, a Phobic Anxiety Disorder and a Specific Anxiety Disorder. Despite prolonged treatment he continues to suffer ongoing anxiety.”An MoD spokesman said: ““We carefully consider all claims and pay compensation where we have a legal obligation to do so. As litigation is currently ongoing, it would be inappropriate to comment further.” The pilot’s Nikon DSLR camera was positioned in front of his arm rest and became jammed with the plane’s controls when he moved his seat forward in the incident. The camera wedged between his arm rest and the ‘side-stick’ – a joystick used to control the plane – which pushed it forward, disengaging the auto-pilot and causing the plane to nosedive. read more

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School reports are no longer honest for fear of upsetting pushy parents

School reports are no longer honest for fear of upsetting pushy parents

25 September 0

Dr Julian Murphy says that traditional school reports are a waste of time Dr Murphy said that school reports now largely consist of “waffle” Dr Julian Murphy says that traditional school reports are a waste of time He said that teachers tend to use euphemisms in reports, such as describing a child as “chatty” and “high spirited” rather than actually saying that the child is badly behaved and disrupting the class.“Speaking as a parent, if my son or daughter is being badly behaved I want to know. I don’t want to be told they are chatty,” he said.“I don’t think traditional school reports are worth doing – they waste a lot of teacher time and they are not necessarily particularly useful for parents.“Parents are busy people. They don’t want to read through a load of waffle about how ‘Jane is a lovely girl’. They already know she is a lovely girl, they live with her. They want to know where she is at, what could she achieve, where is the gap and how do we close it.”Dr Murphy told how he has axed “traditional” school reports in favour of a biannual set of “Smart” – which stands for specific, measurable, action, relevant and , time related – targets, modelled on the kind of feedback that employees are given by their boss at a review in the workplace. School reports are a waste of time as teachers are no longer honest for fear of upsetting pushy parents, a headmaster has said.Teachers do not want to risk any potential fall-out with parents who may complain if they feel their child has been unfairly criticised, according to Dr Julian Murphy, headteacher at the £12,000-a-year school Loughborough Amherst School.He said that school reports now largely consist of “waffle” which serves no purpose at all, as it does not give parents any useful information about their children’s progress.“When I went to school you would get reports that say ‘so and so is extremely lazy or arrogant’. But now no one says that – it would upset parents,” Dr Murphy told The Daily Telegraph.–– ADVERTISEMENT ––“Then when parents say ‘Why didn’t anyone tell me there was a problem?’ teachers say ‘Well, we did’. But they did it too politely.“It is a cultural change – now parents are more likely to say to teachers: ‘You have upset my child, you have damaged their confidence, the problem isn’t my child, it’s you’.”Dr Murphy said that while the fear of provoking a bad reaction from parents is apparent among teachers at all types of schools, it can be more acute at private institutions since “we don’t want to lose customers”. Dr Murphy said that school reports now largely consist of “waffle” Each student is given specific targets and a time frame in which they need to meet them. They are also given a grade for their approach to learning in various different categories including teamwork, independent work, confidence and contribution in lessons.But he said these points are merely “brief reporting points”, adding: “If you need a discussion, you pick up the phone”.Earlier this year, a Government advisory panel found that lengthy school reports are “incredibly burdensome” for teachers and should be replaced with shorter versions. A review commissioned by Damian Hinds, the Education Secretary, found “limited evidence” for the benefits of progress reports that go beyond the “relatively lean” basic requirements imposed on schools.It also suggested expanding the use of “automatic reporting” to parents – currently used by some schools to flag up a child’s absence.Mr Hinds’s department has pledged to review national guidance on school reports, suggesting it could be altered to warn teachers against sending long updates to parents and guardians. Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings. read more

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Duke of Cambridge turns interviewer as he quizzes Sir David Attenborough at

Duke of Cambridge turns interviewer as he quizzes Sir David Attenborough at

25 September 0

The Duke of Cambridge has asked Sir David Attenborough for advice on how he can help to save the planet as he steps into a role as a global “leader”, promising the hard work will happen on his generation’s watch.The Duke, who is second in line to the throne, asked the naturalist how he and his peers can “build on what you have started”, as Sir David warned about the “extermination” of species.The pair spoke on stage in Davos, the annual gathering of the World Economic Forum, where the Duke turned interviewer for a special session recognising Sir David’s contribution to the natural world.The session saw Sir David speak of his renewed hope that world leaders were paying attention to critical environmental issues.He also used the platform to discuss his new Netflix show, Our Planet. Despite a lifelong career at the BBC, he said he had been impressed with the streaming service’s worldwide reach, adding: “This picture of the world will be coming worldwide simultaneously on one particular date and remain there.” He told Sir David: “People of my generation now are beginning to step into positions of leadership around the world.“The work to save the planet is probably largely going to happen on our watch. What advice do you have for my generation and what can we build on that you have started?”Sir David replied: “There has never been a time when more people have been out of touch with the natural world, than there is now. Every year the WEF asks its members to rank the most pressing problems in the world ahead of the gathering in Davos. This year, climate change concerns topped the “worry list”.The Duke was interviewing Sir David in a packed Congress Hall, the biggest room at the World Economic Forum in Davos. The event had been moved from earlier in the day and a smaller room because of”unprecedented demand” from delegates to attend the event, according to WEF officials. Today, delegates were shown a clip from Our Planet showing an iceberg the size of a skyscraper shearing off and plunging into the sea. Explaining how the clip had been filmed, Sir David said he had huge respect for the helicopter pilots who had to dodge tidal waves and massive up draughts of air to get the camera crews in close.  The Duke of Cambridge and Sir David Attenborough at DavosCredit:PA  The Duke, a former air ambulance helicopter pilot, said: “All helicopter pilots are skilful, David.” The Davos session saw him question Sir David on the challenges facing the planet he and his children will live on, including why previous leaders had taken “so long” with “quite a few faltering steps” to act on the environment.“Because the connection between the natural world and urban world has been remote and widening,” said Sir David. His father, the Prince of Wales, is deeply interested in conservation and has been giving speeches about climate change for decades.The Duke’s words were a public acknowledgement of the leadership role he has been moving towards for some time, as he moved back to London to take on more official duties from the Queen, and undertook a statesmanlike trip to the Middle East. Prince William and David Attenborough discuss the challenges facing the natural world A clip from Our Planet, screened during the Q&ACredit:AP Prince Charles and Princess Anne meet naturalist David Attenborough at Lime Grove Studios on the 4th January, 1958.Credit:Hulton Archive “We are destroying the natural world — and with it, ourselves.” – Sir David Attenborough speaking to The Duke of Cambridge at #WEF18 pic.twitter.com/RTBz2bt57P— Kensington Palace (@KensingtonRoyal) January 22, 2019 The Duke of Cambridge and Sir David Attenborough at Davos The Duke also raised the Paris agreement, the 2015 political summit at which leaders vowed to combat climate change by restricting the global temperature rise to below 2C above pre-industrial levels.Saying “that’s where we must put our faith”, Sir David appeared to reference US President Donald Trump when he noted: “There have been people who wish to withdraw from that.”He added that he felt optimistic after seeing world leaders at Davos appear to pay attention to the natural world, acknowledging they had the power to change its future. The Duke turns interviewer at DavosCredit:AFP The Duke turns interviewer at Davos A clip from Our Planet, screened during the Q&A “Now it’s possible to put on a transmission and it’s seen worldwide by hundreds of millions of people, and will go on being seen.“This picture of the world will be coming worldwide simultaneously on one particular date and remain there.” “We didn’t realise the effect of what we were doing out there. Now we are seeing that almost everything we do has its echoes and implications across the natural world.“We have now to really care for what we do [because] we can exterminate things without even knowing.”The Duke said: “The repercussions go for generations.”Speaking specifically about Our Planet, the Duke asked why Sir David had chosen to work with “the WWF, Silverback Films and Netflix”.“By putting it on Netflix it became possible overnight to reach 150m people, immediately,” said Sir David.“In the 1950s, television in Britain was seen by a few million people in southern England. Prince Charles and Princess Anne meet naturalist David Attenborough at Lime Grove Studios on the 4th January, 1958. “We have to recognise that every breath of air we take, every mouthful of food we take, comes from the natural world.”And if we damage the natural world, we damage ourselves. We are one coherent ecosystem.”It’s not just a question of beauty, or interest, or wonder: it’s the essential part of human life is a healthy planet.”The Duke, who is patron of Tusk and conservation group United For Wildlife, has previously also warned that the clock is ticking towards a tipping point when human beings’ impact on the environment will be irreversible. As the Duke tried out his new role as interrogator, he admitted: “Normally I have to endure people asking me questions, so it’s quite nice to turn the tables for once.” Prince William and David Attenborough discuss the challenges facing the natural worldCredit:AFP read more

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