Posts under "yemiwbag"

Lee, Barroca say Hotshots surprised by Devance in Game 6

Posted in yemiwbag on January 20th, 2020

first_imgView comments Prince Harry: ‘No other option’ but to cut royal ties LATEST STORIES Poe chides LTFRB exec over termination of motorcycle taxi pilot study PBA IMAGESStar guards Paul Lee and Mark Barroca agreed Joe Devance caught the Hotshots off guard in a 91-67 loss in Game 6 on Sunday.“Joe stepped up. We weren’t ready for that,” said Lee, who finished the game with eight points and three rebounds.ADVERTISEMENT Filipinos turn Taal Volcano ash, plastic trash into bricks PLAY LIST 01:40Filipinos turn Taal Volcano ash, plastic trash into bricks01:32Taal Volcano watch: Island fissures steaming, lake water receding02:14Carpio hits red carpet treatment for China Coast Guard02:56NCRPO pledges to donate P3.5 million to victims of Taal eruption00:56Heavy rain brings some relief in Australia02:37Calm moments allow Taal folks some respite Palace: Crisis over ABS-CBN franchise unlikely Municipal councilor nabbed for indiscriminate firing in Leyte “We were really surprised. He wasn’t playing for the longest time and he really shocked us. It was huge for them,” said Barroca, as Devance fought through his right plantar fasciitis injury to deliver for this game.Charging this loss to experience, Barroca said Star must better prepare itself for the do-or-die tiff.“In those situations, we shouldn’t take them for granted, like Joe’s foot was hurting because we know that he’s a veteran and he can step up,” he said.He also stressed the Hotshots have to go back to their old unselfish ways.“We have to stay together. We’re enjoying ourselves, but it has to be as a team. We can’t put them down individually. When we play, we really have to be united 14 heroes in those situations,” he said.ADVERTISEMENT 15 Taal towns now under total lockdown Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. Motorcycle taxis ‘illegal’ starting next week — LTFRB board member 98% of residents in Taal Volcano’s 14-kilometer danger zone evacuated – DILG Westbrook, Durant provide All-Star highlight “We were surprised by Joe. He gave them quality minutes,” said Barroca, who had 13 markers and four assists in the defeat, in Filipino. “His two three-points really hurt us. We thought we’re going on a run in the third quarter, but it was Joe who had a good game.”Playing through pain, Devance drilled a pair of treys that ignited the blazing Ginebra run in the third quarter, unfurling all of his 14 points and three rebounds in the pivotal period.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSEnd of his agony? SC rules in favor of Espinosa, orders promoter heirs to pay boxing legendSPORTSBreak new groundSPORTSMcGregor blasts Cerrone in 40 seconds in UFC returnHis defense also kept Star bigs off the boards as Ginebra went on a 10-2 tear to end the quarter, 62-54.That spelled doom for the Hotshots as they were forced into winner-take-all Game 7 on Tuesday in their 2017 PBA Philippine Cup semifinals series. MOST READ Marcos monument beside Aquino’s stirs Tarlac town Lee said Star must be more focused on the defensive end after allowing Ginebra to shoot 49 percent from the field.“It’s really our defense,” he said. “We no longer need any motivation. We, players, know what we’re going to do. It’s win-or-go home for us.”Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next Motorcycle taxis ‘illegal’ starting next week — LTFRB board memberlast_img read more

Brazil’s fitness concerns grow

Posted in yemiwbag on January 19th, 2020

first_imgLONDON (AP):Brazil winger Douglas Costa and midfielder Renato Augusto will miss tomorrow’s friendly against Croatia in Liverpool, raising further worries about the fitness of the squad for the World Cup.Coach Tite already had injury concerns over Neymar, his fellow striker Gabriel Jesus and reserve right-back Fagner following troubled seasons for all three.The Brazilian football confederation said yesterday that Costa and Augusto would sit out the team’s first World Cup warm-up match at Anfield.Neymar is not expected to start the game but should feature for the first time since injuring his foot in February. Fagner will also be available after coming through training this week.Costa has not practised since training began last week in Brazil due to a thigh injury.Augusto’s right knee has been swollen since Wednesday. The Beijing Guoan player will likely be replaced by Manchester City’s Fernandinho in the starting line-up.In Thursday’s press conference at Tottenham’s training centre, Fernandinho said he was also likely to play in the friendly in Austria on June 10, which indicates Augusto may not be fit until the World Cup begins in Russia.During Wednesday’s training session, Neymar took off his right boot, sat on the ground and looked less than happy.last_img read more

Spectra United Way award

Posted in yemiwbag on January 11th, 2020

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Badgers win streak ends at 17

Posted in yemiwbag on January 11th, 2020

first_imgRatliff scored 18 of his season-high 20 points in the second half and Indiana held off No. 2 Wisconsin 71-66 on Wednesday night, ending the Badgers’ 17-game winning streak. But before Ratliff and the rest of his teammates could get off the court, several thousand delirious fans stormed out of the stands and onto the floor in celebration. “I’m claustrophobic anyway,” said Ratliff, who was quickly mobbed by the Indiana fans. “I was just trying to get to the locker room. It was funny, but it was kind of scary at the same time.” 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! Ratliff was even scarier for the Badgers during the game. He had a pair of 3-pointers during a 13-1 run and another 3-pointer that gave the Hoosiers (16-5, 6-2 Big Ten) a 53-43 lead with under 10 minutes remaining. A rebound basket by Alando Tucker, who led Wisconsin (21-2, 7-1) with 23 points, and two 3-pointers by Kammron Taylor helped the Badgers tie the game at 59. But Ratliff scored six of Indiana’s next eight points, including two free throws with a minute to go to for a 70-66 lead, and the Badgers never recovered. last_img read more

Transferring to universities can be rough

Posted in yemiwbag on December 29th, 2019

first_imgSACRAMENTO – Transferring community college credits to universities remains difficult and confusing for students and should be made more consistent, state Legislative Analyst’s Office officials said Tuesday. For example, students who take a particular set of math classes to meet the transfer admission requirements for the University of California, Los Angeles, might find they need a different set to get into UC at Berkeley. The difficulty in determining what will be accepted at different University of California and California State University campuses leads to confusion and often forces community college students to spend more time and money on classes than necessary, according to a report from Legislative Analyst Elizabeth Hill’s office. “At the student level, it’s difficult to determine: Does this course meet this requirement, or which requirement does this course meet?” said Anthony Simbol, an analyst in the office. “If you streamlined it, a student takes a course and he’ll know this course meets the UC requirement for introductory physics. Boyum said students can get help by accessing CSU Mentor for an online transfer planner. “For the student who knows what she wants to do and where she wants to go, (it) is going to (give) a very direct route for doing that.” Students who don’t know where they want to transfer to or what they want to study would be directed to take general-education classes, with the hope that they would find their chosen major in one of those classes, Boyum said. “We always believe we can do a better job,” remarked Brad Hayward, spokesman for the UC system, although he said he had not yet had a chance to review the LAO report in detail. “We have been working with the community colleges around the state to make sure every UC has an agreement with every community college specifying how students can prepare for a UC major and have a smooth path to a UC degree.” Some students at Los Angeles Valley College and Pierce College said it’s fairly easy to figure out what courses are required to transfer – if the student has selected the transfer destination and major. “It’s not rocket science,” said LAVC student Ashley Dickerson, 18, of Toluca Lake, who said she found most of the information she needed online. Robert Cojulun, 20, of Panorama City, another LAVC student, said he has known for a long time that he wants to study human genetics at UC Berkeley. But he says he knows other students who attend community college without such goals. “My mom says I have to do something, either get a job or go to school,” he said uncommitted students often tell him, “and they don’t want to work, so they go to school.” Harrison Sheppard, (916)446-6723 harrison.sheppard@dailynews.com 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MOREGift Box shows no rust in San Antonio Stakes win at Santa Anita “They won’t have to worry about: Well, does it meet Berkeley’s physics requirement? It makes the process a lot easier.” State officials have recently tried to improve the process for CSU campuses, enacting a 2004 bill from Sen. Jack Scott, D-Pasadena, that required the CSU system and community colleges to develop a uniform set of requirements. But Simbol noted the bill allowed a few loopholes for a small number of courses that continue to vary across campuses. The LAO report recommends closing those loopholes, as well as applying the same process to the UC system. Scott has a pending bill now to do that, but the process is seen as more complicated for UC than it was for CSU. Keith Boyum, associate vice chancellor for academic affairs for the CSU system, said its 23 campuses were already pretty much “one size fits all” in terms of transfer requirements, with some variations for impacted programs. For example, students who want to transfer to the impacted campuses at CSU Long Beach and Cal Poly San Luis Obispo need to declare a major when they apply. last_img read more

Antelope Valley Calendar

Posted in yemiwbag on December 25th, 2019

first_img AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MORESurfer attacked by shark near Channel Islands calls rescue a ‘Christmas miracle’Al-Anon will have a Spanish-speaking discussion meeting, 9 a.m. at 38345 30th St. E., Suite C-3, Palmdale. Call (661) 274-9353. Facilitated Anger Management Group for ages 8-11 will meet, 2:30-4 p.m.; teens, 4:30-6 p.m., and adults, 10:30-noon or 12:30-2 p.m. at the Family Resource Foundation, 38345 30th St. E., Suite A-2, Palmdale. Call (661) 266-8700 or (800) 479-CARE or visit the Web site: www.frf.av.org. Beginning yoga, 9-10 a.m. at Unity Church of Antelope Valley, 39149 8th St. E., Palmdale. Call (661) 273-3341. Women and Self-esteem support group will meet in the Acton area. Call (661) 947-0839. Compulsive Eaters Anonymous – HOW Concept will meet, 9 a.m. at St. Stephen’s Lutheran Church, 1737 E. Ave. R, Palmdale. Call Jane at (661) 945-4798. Women Midlife Transition Support Group for women over age 40 is facilitated by a professional psychotherapist. Call (661) 947-0839. Overeaters Anonymous will meet, 10-11:30 a.m. in Room 13 at Lancaster United Methodist Church, 918 W. Ave. J, Lancaster. Call (661) 724-1820. Hotline: (661) 789-5806. Narcotics Anonymous: For meeting times and locations, call (661) 266-2200 or check www.todayna.org or www.sava-na.org. SUNDAY Nicotine Anonymous will meet, 8-9 p.m. at Seventh-day Adventist Church, 43824 30th St. W., Lancaster. Call (661) 946-7606. Buklod ng Pagkakaisa (Bond of Unity) Seniors’ Social Hour, 4-7 p.m. the first Sunday of each month at the Antelope Valley Senior Center, 777 W. Jackman St., Lancaster. Meetings feature films, talks, singalongs, talent shows and dancing. Call (661) 723-7876 or (661) 726-5309. Costume Figure Sessions, 2:30-5:30 p.m. the fourth Sunday of each month at Cedar Centre Hall, 44857 Cedar Ave. Cost: $5; students with identification are admitted free. 40 and Up Singles dance, 6:30-10:30 p.m. every Sunday at Lancaster Elks Lodge, 240 E. Ave. K, Lancaster. Admission: $5 members, $7 nonmembers. Call (661) 946-5156. Life Figure Sessions, 2:30-5:30 p.m. the second Sunday of each month at Cedar Centre Hall, 44857 Cedar Ave. Cost: $5; students with ID are admitted free. Teen Care and Support Group, for teens who have lost a family member or friend, will meet, 6:30 p.m. at Desert Vineyard Christian School, 1011 E. Ave. I, Room 302, Lancaster. Call (661) 945-2777. Palmdale Moose Lodge, 3101 E. Ave. Q, Palmdale, will host bingo games beginning at 1 p.m. Call (661) 947-6777. Revealing Truth, a meditation and spiritual discussion, 4:45-6:15 p.m. Call (661) 723-9967. Antelope Valley Chess Club will meet, 1-5 p.m. at American Legion Post 771, 39463 10th St. E., Palmdale. Call (661) 726-1323. Narcotics Anonymous: For meeting times and locations, call (661) 266-2200 or check www.sava-na.org. Overeaters Anonymouswill meet, 5-6 p.m. at 44960 Cedar Ave., Lancaster. Call (661) 789-5806. MONDAY Beyond the Light, a socialization and support group for young adults, ages 17 1/2 to 25, with mental health issues, will meet, noon-1 p.m. at Transitional Youth Services, 104 E. Ave. K-4, Lancaster. Call Bill Slocum at (661) 947-1595. Jazzercise classes, 5:30-6:30 p.m. at George Lane Park, 5520 W. Ave. L-8, Quartz Hill. (661) 722-7780. Dance Groove will give ballroom and Latin dance lessons, 6-8:30 p.m. Dance Groove Studio, 43631 10th St. W., Lancaster. Cost: $5. (661) 948-9101. Take Off Pounds Sensibly, 9-10:30 a.m. (661) 272-0207 or (661) 947-7672. Co-Dependents Anonymous Step Study will meet, 6-7 p.m. at Antelope Valley Hospital, multipurpose meeting room, second floor, 1600 W. Ave. J, Lancaster. Call (661) 944-4927. 12-Step Recovery Groups for alcohol and drug addiction, co-dependency, relationship addiction, overeating, fear and anxiety issues, 7 p.m. at Desert Vineyard Christian Fellowship, 1011 E. Ave. I, Lancaster. Call (661) 945-2777. The Palmdale Elks Lodge, 2705 E. Ave. Q, Palmdale will host bingo, 5:30p.m. The grill will be open. Call (661) 947-2027. Overeaters Anonymous will meet, 6-7 p.m. at Lancaster United Methodist Church, 918 W. Ave. J, Lancaster. Call (661) 722-0393. Co-Dependents Anonymous will host a 12-step recovery program, 7:30-9p.m., at Antelope Valley Hospital, multipurpose meeting room, second floor, 1600 W. Ave. J, Lancaster. Call (661) 944-4927 or (661) 946-5846. Grief Recovery Outreach Group, 6:30-8 p.m. at Family Resource Foundation, 38345 30th St. E., Suite A-2, Palmdale. (661) 266-8700 or www.frf.av.org. Adult Anger Management Group will meet, 6:30-8 p.m. at Family Resource Foundation, 38345 30th St. E., Suite A-2, Palmdale. Call (661) 266-8700. The Highs and Lows, a support group for those diagnosed with manic depression or related disorders, will meet, 7-9 p.m. at Lutheran Church of the Master, 725 E. Ave. J, Lancaster. Al-Anon will have a discussion, 7 p.m. at 51st Street West and Avenue K, Lancaster. Child care provided. Call (661) 274-9353 or (800) 344-2666. Take Off Pounds Sensibly Chapter 572 will meet, 9-11a.m. at the Mayflower Gardens chapel, 6570 W. Ave. L-12, Quartz Hill. Call (661) 943-3089. Early bird bingo games will begin at 6 p.m. with regular games beginning at 6:30 p.m. at the Palmdale Elks Lodge, 2705 E. Ave. Q, Palmdale. Call (661) 947-2027. Early bird bingo games will begin at 6:30 p.m. with regular games beginning at 7p.m. at Paraclete High School, 42145 30th St. W., Lancaster. (661) 943-3255; Monday evenings: (661) 943-1017. Billiard Gang for seniors will meet, 9:15 a.m.-4 p.m. at the Palmdale Senior Center, 1002 E. Ave. Q-12, Palmdale. Call (661) 267-5551. Flex and stretch, a workout for seniors, 8-9 a.m. at the Palmdale Senior Center, 1002 E. Ave. Q-12, Palmdale. Bring a floor mat and hand weights. Call (661) 267-5551. Parent support group will meet, 6:30-8 p.m. at Family Resource Foundation, 1529 E. Palmdale Blvd., Suite 203, Palmdale. The facilitated group is for parents who need help coping with family issues. Call (661) 266-8700. Compulsive Eaters Anonymous – HOW Concept will meet, 6 p.m. at the Larry Chimbole Cultural Center, 38530 Sierra Highway, Palmdale. Call (661) 273-1016. Expectant parents can tour the Antelope Valley Hospital obstetrics department, 1600 W. Ave. J in Lancaster, and get information on what to expect during hospitalization, at sessions starting at 6 p.m. Visitors should meet in the main lobby. Narcotics Anonymous: For meeting times and locations, call (661) 266-2200 or check www.sava-na.org. TUESDAY J&J Social and Travel Club will meet for league bowling, 6-8 p.m. at the Sands Bowl, 43323 Sierra Highway, Lancaster. Call (661) 267-2586. Lupus International Support Group meets, 6:30-8 p.m. the second Tuesday of each month in Palmdale. Call for information and location: Danielle Duffey at (888) 532-2322, Ext. 4. Business Network International B2 Bombers chapter will meet, 12:15 p.m. at Eduardo’s restaurant, 819 W. Palmdale Blvd., Palmdale. Call (661) 609-1288 or e-mail audmill@qnet.com. The organization’s Web site is at www.bni-scav.com. Prostate Cancer Support Group meets, 12:30 p.m. the third Tuesday of each month at Lutheran Church of the Master, 725 E. Ave. J, Lancaster. Call Susan Baker at (661) 273-2200. Toddler story time for children ages 2-6, 9:30 and 11:30 a.m. at Barnes & Noble, 39228 10th St. W., Palmdale. Call (661) 272-9134. Celebrate Discovery, a Christian-based 12-step program, will meet, 6:30 p.m. at Palmdale United Methodist Church, 39055 10th St. W., Palmdale. Call (661) 947-3103. Jazzercise classes, 5:30-6:30 p.m. at George Lane Park, 5520 W. Ave. L-8 in Quartz Hill. Call (661) 722-7780. Successful Anger Management course, 7-9 p.m. in Lancaster. Call (661) 538-1846. Sand Creek Orators, Toastmaster International meets, 7:30 p.m. the second and fourth Tuesdays of each month at Hummel Hall, 2200 Orange St. W., Rosamond. Call Miik Miller at (661) 256-0328. Caregiver Support Group will meet, 5:30-7 p.m. in Conference Room 1 at Lancaster Community Hospital in Lancaster. Sponsored by ProCare Hospice. Call (661) 951-1146. Tears in My Heart Support Group will meet, 10:30 a.m.-noon and 5:30-7 p.m. at ProCare Hospice, 42442 10th St. W., Suite D, Lancaster. Call (661) 951-1146. Pancho Barnes Composite Squadron 49, Civil Air Patrol, will meet, 6-8:30 p.m. at Rosamond Sky Park, 4171 Knox Ave., Rosamond. Call (760) 373-5771. Antelope Valley Archaeology Club will meet, 9:30-11 a.m. at the Larry Chimbole Cultural Center, 38350 Sierra Highway, Palmdale. Call (661) 267-5656. Grief Support Group will meet, 5:30-7 p.m. at the Hoffmann Hospice, 1832 W. Ave. K, Suite D-1. Call (661) 948-8801. Take Off Pounds Sensibly will meet, 9-10:30 a.m. Call (661) 272-0207 or (661) 947-7672. Snyders Dance Groove meets, 6-8:30 p.m. the first and second Tuesdays of each month at the Antelope Valley Senior Center, 777 W. Jackman St., Lancaster. Cost: $2. Call (661) 609-6510. Mothers of Preschoolers (MOPS) meets, 9-11:30 a.m. the second and fourth Tuesdays of each month for brunch, speakers and crafts at Central Christian Church, 3131 W. Ave. J, Lancaster. Cost: $6 per meeting, plus $2 per child for child care. Scholarships are available. Call (661) 945-7902. 12-Step Recovery Group for alcohol and drug addiction will meet, 7 p.m. at Desert Vineyard Christian Fellowship, 1011 E. Ave. I, Lancaster. Call (661) 945-2777. High Desert Woodworkers Club meets, 6:30 p.m. the first Tuesday of each month at Denny’s restaurant, 2005 W. Ave. K, Lancaster. Call (760) 240-4705. Grief/Bereavement Group will meet, 10:30 a.m.-noon and 5:30-7:30 p.m. at ProCare Hospice, 42442 10th St. W., Suite D, Lancaster. Call (661) 951-1146. Youth Anger Management Group for ages 8-11 will meet, 6:30-8 p.m. at Family Resource Foundation, 38345 30th St. E., Suite A-2, Palmdale. Call (661) 266-8700 or (800) 479-CARE, or visit the Web site: www.frf.av.org. Plane Talk Toastmasters will meet, noon-1 p.m. at the Lockheed Federal Credit Union, 1011 Lockheed Way, Palmdale. Call Doug Kelley at (661) 572-4123. Harmony Showcase Chorus of Sweet Adelines International will rehearse, 7:30 p.m. at 44857 Cedar Ave., Lancaster. The group is part of an international organization of women who sing four-part harmony. Call (661) 273-0995, (661) 285-1797 or (661) 940-3109. Al-Anon will hold a discussion, noon at 1737 E. Ave. R, Room 104, Palmdale, and at 7 p.m. at the Larry Chimbole Cultural Center, Room 704, Palmdale. Call (661) 274-9353 or (800) 344-2666. Cardio Knockout Blast, a workout for seniors, 8-9 a.m. at the Palmdale Senior Center, 1002 E. Ave. Q-12, Palmdale. Bring a floor mat. Call (661) 267-5551. Billiards Gang for seniors, 9 a.m.-4:30 p.m. at the Palmdale Senior Center, 1002 E. Ave. Q-12, Palmdale. Call (661) 267-5551. Health Insurance Counseling and Advocacy Program representative will be available, 1-3 p.m. at the Palmdale Senior Center, 1002 E. Ave. Q-12, Palmdale. Call (661) 267-5551 for an appointment. Tumbleweed Card Club for seniors will play canasta, pinochle and other games, 1-4:30 p.m. at the Palmdale Senior Center, 1002 E. Ave. Q-12, Palmdale. Call (661) 267-5551. Line dancing, 6-7 p.m. for beginners and 7-8:30 p.m. for intermediate dancers at the Palmdale Senior Center, 1002 E. Ave. Q-12, Palmdale. Call (661) 267-5551. Palmdale Youth Council will meet, 5:30 p.m. at the Palmdale Parks and Recreation office, 38260 10th St. E., Palmdale. Call (661) 267-5611. Sierra Club will offer one- to two-hour conditioning hikes leaving at 6 p.m. from the Palmdale Park and Ride lot, Avenue S at the Antelope Valley Freeway. Moderately conditioned beginning hikers are welcome. Call (661) 948-7333. Expectant parent tours of the Antelope Valley Hospital obstetrics department will start at 6 p.m. from the hospital lobby, 1600 W. Ave. J, Lancaster. Overeaters Anonymous will meet, 7-9 p.m. at Our Savior Lutheran Church, 1821 W. Lancaster Blvd., Lancaster. Beginners will meet at 7 p.m. Call (661) 948-2571. Hotline: (661) 789-5806. Compulsive Eaters Anonymous – HOW Concept will meet, 10:30 a.m. at the Larry Chimbole Cultural Center, 38530 Sierra Highway, Palmdale. Call (661) 274-4178. Also in Lancaster, 6:30 p.m. at Sunnydale School, 1233 W. Ave. J-8. Call Karen at (661) 723-9331. Overeaters Anonymous – HOW Concept will meet, 7:15 p.m. at Robin’s Law Office, 203 W. Ave. J, Lancaster. Call (661) 949-9192. Narcotics Anonymous: For meeting times and locations, call (661) 266-2200 or check www.sava-na.org. WEDNESDAY J&J Social and Travel Club will host a discussion on “the clever consumer,” 7 p.m. in Lancaster. Bring a snack to share and a beverage. Call (661) 267-2586 or 943-5998. Emotional Freedom Technique for pain relief weekly demonstrations, 6:30-7:30 p.m. (except before three-day weekends), Stress Management Institute for Living Empowered, 44130 Division St., Lancaster. Call (661) 942-4220. Sweet Talkers Toastmasters will meet, 7-8:30 p.m. in the Wilsona School District boardroom, 18050 E. Ave. 0, Lake Los Angeles. Call (661) 944-1216 or 944-1130. Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 3000 will serve specialty meals, or hamburger baskets, 5:30-8 p.m. at the post, 4342 W. Ave. L, Quartz Hill. Proceeds will benefit community affairs. Members, guests and public welcome. Call (661) 943-2225. Kids Managing Anger Together for ages 13-17 will meet, 4:30-6 p.m. at 38345 30th St. E., Suite. B-1, Palmdale. Court approved. Call (661) 266-8700. Low-cost Facilitated Women’s Group will deal with the death of a loved one, divorce, loss of relationship, infertility and other issues, noon-1:30 p.m. Call (661) 266-8700. Fobi-Lyte Support Group meets, 7-8:30 p.m. the second and fourth Wednesdays of each month to address the medical, nutritional and social ramifications of weight-loss surgery in fourth-floor Conference Room 16 at Antelope Valley Outpatient Imaging Center, 44105 15th St. W., Lancaster. Call (661) 723-5123. Caregivers Support Group meets, 7-8:30 p.m. the first and third Wednesdays of each month at Los Angeles Caregiver Resource Center, 44421 10th St. W., Suite I, Lancaster. Call (661) 945-4852. Take Off Pounds Sensibly will meet, 9-10:30 a.m. Call (661) 272-0207 or (661) 947-7672. Eye Opener Toastmasters Club will meet, 7-8:30 a.m. at Crazy Otto’s Restaurant, 1228 W. Ave. I, Lancaster. Call Al Moore at (661) 726-3627. Scrapbookers Club will meet, 5-7 p.m. at Peldyns, 27021 Twenty Mule Team Road, Boron. Free tools for use. Bring book and photos. Call (760) 608-1422. Antelope Valley Intertribal Council meeting, 7 p.m. the first Wednesday of each month at the Larry Chimbole Cultural Center, 38350 Sierra Highway, Palmdale. Call (661) 435-0423. Dual Recovery Anonymous, an informal 12-step group for mental health consumers with a history of substance abuse, will meet, 3 p.m. at the Antelope Valley Discovery Center, 1609 E. Palmdale Blvd., Suite G. Call (661) 947-1595. Antelope Valley Interfaith Choir will meet, 6:30-8 p.m. For adults and mature teenagers. Call Kathe Walters at (661) 285-8306. Hi-Desert Woodworkers Club meets, 6:30 p.m. the first Wednesday of each month at Don’s Restaurant, Victorville. Call (760) 240-4705. Schizophrenics Anonymous will meet, 2 p.m. at the Discovery Center, 1609 E. Palmdale Blvd., Suite G, Palmdale. Call Bill Slocum at (661) 947-1595 or (661) 319-5101. Desert Noon Lions Club meets, noon-1 p.m. the first and third Wednesdays of each month at the California Pantry, 120 E. Palmdale Blvd., Palmdale. Call Barbara at (661) 947-4079. Successful Marriage and Parenting course, 7-9 p.m. in Lancaster. Free. For information and location, call (661) 538-1846. Emotions Anonymous will meet, 7-8:30 p.m. in the multipurpose meeting room on the second floor at Antelope Valley Hospital, 1600 W. Ave. J, Lancaster. The organization is a 12-step, self-help group. Call (661) 943-5466. Little Angels, a support group for families with young children with Down syndrome, meets, 6:30 p.m. the third Wednesday of each month at the North Los Angeles County Regional Center, 43210 Gingham Ave., Lancaster. Call Cyndee Moore at (661) 945-6761 or e-mail cyndeem@nlacrc.com. Al-Anon discussion group will meet, 7 p.m. at 39055 10th St. W., Palmdale; Alateen at 7 p.m. at 39055 10th St. W., Palmdale, and a women’s discussion group at 7:30 p.m. at 32142 Crown Valley Road, Acton. Call (661) 274-9353 or (800) 344-2666. A Course in Miracles discussion, 7-9 p.m. Call (661) 723-9967. Palmdale Moose Lodge, 3101 E. Ave. Q, Palmdale, will host bingo games beginning at 10 a.m. Call (661) 947-6777. Bridge Club for seniors will meet, noon-3 p.m. at the Palmdale Senior Center, 1002 E. Ave. Q-12, Palmdale. Beginner and intermediate players welcome. Call (661) 267-5551. Blood pressure testing for seniors, 10-11:15 a.m. at the Palmdale Senior Center, 1002 E. Ave. Q-12, Palmdale. Call (661) 267-5551. Billiard Gang for seniors, 9 a.m.-4:30 p.m. at the Palmdale Senior Center, 1002 E. Ave. Q-12, Palmdale. Call (661) 267-5551. Flex and stretch, a workout for seniors, 8-9 a.m. at the Palmdale Senior Center, 1002 E. Ave. Q-12, Palmdale. Bring a floor mat and hand weights. Call (661) 267-5551. Knitting and crocheting for seniors, 9 a.m.-3 p.m. at the Larry Chimbole Cultural Center, 704 E. Palmdale Blvd., Palmdale. Bring your own supplies. Call (661) 267-5551. Compulsive Eaters Anonymous – HOW Concept will meet, 6:30 p.m. at Palmdale Children’s Youth Library, 38510 Sierra Highway. Call Kathy at (661) 265-1839. Overeaters Anonymous will meet, 6:30-7:30 p.m. in Multipurpose Room 2 at Antelope Valley Hospital, 1600 W. Ave. J, Lancaster. Call (661) 256-7064. Hotline: (661) 789-5806. Women’s Eating Disorder Group will meet, 6-7:30 p.m. at Family Resource Foundation, 1529 E. Palmdale Blvd., Suite 203, Palmdale. Call (661) 266-8700. Bingo for seniors, 12:15-2:15 p.m. at the Palmdale Senior Center, 1002 E. Ave. Q-12, Palmdale. Cost: 25 cents per card. Call (661) 267-5551. Talents Unlimited Toastmasters will meet, 7 p.m. at Kaiser Permanente Mental Health Center, 44444 20th St. W., Lancaster. Call Dana at (661) 949-7423. Narcotics Anonymous: For meeting times and locations, call (661) 266-2200 or check www.todayna.org. THURSDAY Ask and It is Given classes, 6:30-8 p.m., Stress Management Institute for Living Empowered, 44130 Division St., Lancaster. Call (661) 942-4220. High Desert Toastmasters will meet, 7-8:30 p.m. at Larry Chimbole Cultural Center, 38350 Sierra Highway, Palmdale. Call Eric Riddle at (661) 274-8252. High Desert Modular Model Railroad Club meets, 7 p.m. the second Thursday of each month in the Experimental Test Pilots Association boardroom, 44814 Elm Ave., Lancaster. Call Bob Drury at (661) 400-4479. Cedar Open Reading meets weekly, 7-9 p.m. at Cedar Hall, 44851 Cedar Ave., Lancaster, except on the second Thursday of the month, when the meeting is in the gallery, 44857 Cedar Ave., Lancaster. Call (661) 943-4314. The Overcomers, an emotional and educational support group for mental health consumers, will meet, 6:30 p.m. at the Antelope Valley Discovery Center, 1609 E. Palmdale Blvd., Suite G. Call Bill Slocum or Mary Rogers at (661) 947-1595 or (661) 319-5101. Aces & Deuces Square Dance Club will meet, 7-8:15 p.m. for beginners and 8:15-9:30 p.m. for plus at Palmdale Senior Center, 1002 E. Ave. Q-12, Palmdale, for ages 10 and up. Cost: $3. Call (661) 256-7650. Grief/Bereavement Group will meet, 5:30-7:30 p.m. at ProCare Hospice, 42442 10th St. W., Suite D, Lancaster. Call (661) 951-1146. The Ups and Downs, a support group for people with bipolar disorder or depression, will meet, 2 p.m. at the Antelope Valley Discovery Center, 1609 E. Palmdale Blvd., Suite G, Palmdale. Call Bill Slocum at (661) 947-1595 or (661) 319-5101. Facilitated Anger Management Group for teens will meet, 4:30-6 p.m., and adults will meet, 6:30-8 p.m., at Family Resource Foundation, 38345 30th St. E., Suite A-2, Palmdale. Call (661) 266-8700 or (800) 479-CARE or visit the Web site: www.frf.av.org. Al-Anon will host a discussion, 1 p.m. at 1737 E. Ave. R, Palmdale; a step study at 7 p.m. at 1827 E. Ave. Q-10, Palmdale; and a meeting on Steps, Traditions, Concepts at 7:30 p.m. at 44815 Fig Ave., Suite 101, Lancaster. Call (661) 274-9353 or (800) 344-2666. Emotions Anonymous will meet, 7-8:30 p.m. Information and location: (661) 723-9967. Desert Aire Women’s Golf Association will meet at Desert Aire Golf Course at Avenue P and 40th Street East in Palmdale. Call (661) 269-5982. Cardio Knockout Blast, a workout for seniors, 8-9 a.m. at the Palmdale Senior Center, 1002 E. Ave. Q-12, Palmdale. Bring a floor mat. Call (661) 267-5551. Billiard Gang for seniors, 9 a.m.-4:30 p.m. at the Palmdale Senior Center, 1002 E. Ave. Q-12, Palmdale. Call (661) 267-5551. Take Off Pounds Sensibly will meet, 9-10:30 a.m. Call (661) 272-0207 or (661) 947-7672. Sierra Club will offer one- to two-hour conditioning hikes leaving at 6 p.m. from the Palmdale Park and Ride lot, Avenue S at Antelope Valley Freeway. Moderately conditioned beginning hikers are welcome. Call (661) 948-7333.160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! SATURDAY Leona Valley Sertoma Club meets, 8 a.m. the first and third Saturdays of each month at Jackie’s Restaurant, 40352 90th St. W., Leona Valley. Call (661) 270-0339. Low-cost Facilitated Parenting Group will meet, 10-11:30 a.m. Court approved. Call (661) 266-8700. Seniors Lunch-Bingo Hour, noon-5 p.m. the fourth Saturday of each month at the Antelope Valley Senior Center, 777 W. Jackman St., Lancaster. Sponsored by Buklod ng Pagkakaisa (Bond of Unity). Call Emerita Ross at (661) 723-7876 or Marie Cabrera at (661) 726-5309. last_img read more

Wine Bar George Currently Offering Magical Dining Menu

Posted in yemiwbag on December 21st, 2019

first_imgShare This!Wine Bar George at Disney Springs is participating in Visit Orlando’s Magical Dining Month, from now until September 30, 2019.The Magical Dining Menu includes three courses for a flat fee of $35.For the first course, guests may choose between (choose one per person):Hummus with Cucumber, Olive Oil, and Naan BreadJicama-Kohlrabi Salad with Mint Vinaigrette and Pickled JalapeñoFor the second course, guests may choose between (choose two per person):Chicken Skewers with Togarashi and Asian SlawHouse-Made Meatballs with Triple Cheese Polenta and Tomato SauceCrispy Mac & Cheese Bites with Tomato Nage and PecorinoBurrata with San Marzano Tomatoes, Olive Oil, and Grilled BreadFor the third course, guests may choose between (choose one per guest):Olive Oil Cake with Candied Olives and Lemon MascarponeKey Lime PieReservations may be made on the Walt Disney World website or via Open Table directly or through a link on the Wine Bar George site.last_img read more

#Nextchat: Are You Really Reaching Your Employees?

Posted in yemiwbag on December 18th, 2019

first_imgEffective internal communication is one of the most important factors in the success of an organization. Every day, employers send millions of messages to their workers in order to make announcements, deliver policies and procedures, communicate strategy, and improve moral. While larger organizations may have public relations and communications departments, messaging at smaller to medium-size companies is often handled by HR professionals. Communication is considered a core competency in SHRM’s new competency model and is absolutely necessary for professional success in the workplace.Changes in attitudes, behaviors and technology are making the job of communicating more difficult. Technology has increased the number of options for communicating with employees and social sharing has blurred the personal and professional lines. Although it’s fairly easy to send a message to onsite desk workers, pushing the same message out to hourly, nondesk workers such as those who work in retail, restaurants, manufacturing or construction-—who don’t have access to company e-mail—can present some challenges.Reaching the hourly nondesk worker A study conducted by Edison Research reports that “56.7 percent of the U.S. workforce is hourly. But we know very little about this worker’s behavior. Because they aren’t connected to a desktop most of their day, they aren’t included in typical employee surveys. Nor do software companies target them for user studies.” More and more, “employers are using personal e-mail, personal text and social media groups to distribute company policies and procedures” but “have no documentation, control or security over messages sent using personal accounts.”ImpactEmployers often send messages without thinking through the objectives or the impact. Organizations are over-communicating and workers are drowning in the inefficient and ineffective dumping of information. It’s important to identify the communication styles that fit your organization’s culture and to be strategic and thoughtful in planning your messages. Does your internal communication add value or noise? How do you know if your messages are reaching all employees? What methods work best and how are you making sure the communication is secure?Please join @shrmnextchat at 3 p.m. ET on March 23 for #Nextchat with special guest Red e App Chief Product Officer Patrick Goodman @_PatrickGoodman. We’ll discuss trends in internal communication.Q1. As an employer, what are your biggest challenges with internal communication?Q2. What are the greatest challenges in communicating with remote and hourly employees?Q3. How does your industry affect the ways in which you communicate with your employees? Is it different for nondesk hourly workers?Q4. Are social platforms an effective method for communicating with all employees? Why or why not?Q5. How do you regulate the communication that is sent to all employees from the various departments in your organization? Q6. What methods of internal communication do you use for emergency communication to employees?Q7. How do you measure employee satisfaction and the effectiveness of your internal communication methods? Q8. How are you protecting your internal communications to employees from security breaches?Q9. How do you ensure that your internal communication to employees is adding value and not creating “noise”?What’s a Twitter chat?last_img read more

CASE STUDY: The Rent-A-Center Loss Prevention Challenge

Posted in yemiwbag on December 17th, 2019

first_imgJoe, a would-be thief, couldn’t believe his luck. Here was a store willing to hand him a brand-new, state-of-the-art smartphone with no credit check and a few dollars down. And just two doors away was another retail store—this one advertising that it paid top dollar for smartphones.The criminal wheels in his mind turned. “Easiest money I’ll ever make,” he thought.But in the real-world version of this scenario—and it did happen—“Joe” was rebuffed when he tried to turn his rent-to-own cell phone into quick cash. Rent-A-Center had registered the phone’s unique identifiers on a blacklist of sorts, so the companion retailer knew not to process the transaction. This was phase one of a security strategy that the Rent-A-Center loss prevention (now asset protection) team devised to protect its rented mobile devices. In short order, the device protection plan the department employed reduced losses by over 50 percent and saved Rent-A-Center millions of dollars.- Sponsor – The Rent-to-Own ModelThe primary challenge faced by Rent-A-Center loss prevention is obvious—and built in to its founding business model. Started as Mr. T’s TV Rental in the 1960s, the concept was the brainchild of Ernie Talley, who wanted to give hardworking customers who lacked cash and credit a way to rent merchandise with an option to own it.The company’s rent-to-own model gives people who lack cash and credit immediate access to top brands and products. “We’re not retail; we’re rent-to-own, so our transactions start where most end,” explained Brian Peacock, CCIP, director of asset protection for Rent-A-Center’s US operations. “When you make your first weekly payment of $30, you can be walking out with a $2,000 TV with no credit check.” It’s a model where some measure of loss is clearly unavoidable—and where the ability to control the amount of loss is critical to business success.From its founding as Rent-A-Center (RAC) in 1986, the company has grown from sixteen stores to approximately 2,600 stores in the United States, Mexico, Canada, and Puerto Rico; employs nearly 21,000 people; and is a leader in an industry that is nearing $7 billion annually. The company earned its reputation by helping people furnish their homes with rent-to-own furniture, appliances, and electronics, but has expanded into computers and mobile devices. It’s in this category that the company started to see problematic losses. “When we entered the mobile space, there was a much higher risk of transaction fraud, and the mobile category saw high losses,” said Peacock.Not every customer chooses to follow the rent-to-own agreement to its conclusion. Some individuals, for example, decide that they can’t afford it, and others decide they want to upgrade. These cases are no problem for RAC; customers simply bring the item back for a return or an exchange. However, in some cases, customers stop making payments, which typically sparks the company’s recovery process.“It depends on what state and what jurisdiction the transaction was in, but typically we would pursue it through our legal department,” explained Peacock. “So as long as we did our work on the front end, we could file against the customer—for a felony in some jurisdictions—or pursue a civil case.”Although RAC was doing an effective job at recovery, the expense of getting products back from delinquent customers was significant, especially with its mobile category. “In our general model, there is already risk, and we realized that we were going to have to figure out a new approach for smartphones, to prevent people from renting a phone and then selling it to an unsuspecting customer on Craigslist or eBay.”An Idea Takes ShapeThe company’s million-dollar device protection solution originated five years ago in the Rent-A-Center loss prevention department, which is now branded as asset protection. The LP team was mulling over ways it could protect its rent-to-own computers. One of the ideas was to secure computers with software that could be remotely activated, essentially rendering them “bricks.” The idea to apply a software solution to inventory hit a snag, however, when Aaron’s—using a similar product— was accused of accessing the cameras on customers’ computers. (Issues in the case are still being litigated. In May 2017, the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals ruled against retailer claims that insurance providers had a duty to defend it in underlying lawsuits.)The case drew quite a bit of attention in the press and caused RAC to rethink its plan to lock rental laptops. “We had put the idea on pause until we started with mobile and smartphones—at that point we knew we were going to have to figure something out to protect our assets,” said Peacock.Through leveraging his retail connections, Peacock turned to Recipero, a data aggregator focused on depriving thieves of a safe and ready market for misappropriated mobile devices. The company collects data from a variety of sources, such as theft reports, carrier contracts, and device ownership data, and shares that with law enforcement, insurers, and retailers—with the goal of helping stakeholders identify instances of fraud, for example in the event that a person sells his or her device and then files an insurance claim, or if a person is attempting to sell a leased device.By leveraging the power of blacklists under its Stop Loss program, Rent-A-Center was able to make an immediate impact on the losses due to fraudulent resale of rented mobile devices. “We got that initial strategy up and running quickly, and we immediately saw a positive impact,” said Peacock.That included the real-world case of “Joe.” When he took his just-rented smartphone to a neighboring GameStop, the device showed up on a “don’t purchase” list, and the retailer turned him away. Thwarted, he returned to the RAC store two doors away and returned the phone.On the backend, RAC gets daily reports with information on which device, when, and where such attempts took place. Within 24 hours, a notification is sent to operations so that a call can be placed to the customer that had possession of the device and make him or her aware that RAC had knowledge of the attempted transaction.Old Strategy, New TwistThe idea of curtailing a crime by denying thieves the ability to benefit from the goods they steal is an old one. Recipero’s website highlights a quote from a book on crime reduction dating back to 1800—“Deprive a thief of a safe and ready market for his goods; and he is undone.”Benefit denial is one of the core principles of a situational crime prevention approach to security, which is built on the theory that an effective way to deter crime is to make attempts more difficult, more risky, and less rewarding. The strategy’s potential to cut crime is clear—if goods aren’t useable or won’t work unless purchased, then there is no reason for someone to steal them. For revenge or out of spite, perhaps, but that’s about it.The strategy has a history in loss prevention, such as the development in the 1980s of ink or dye tags to protect store apparel. In that use case, illicit removal was designed to ruin the garment, thus reducing the ability for a thief to use it or convert it to cash, according to Read Hayes, PhD, CPP, director of the Loss Prevention Research Council. More contemporary benefit-denial techniques include car stereos that don’t function if the faceplate is removed and special hotel hangers with small hooks or ball tops that require special racks. “In this low-tech example, benefit denial does not make stealing hangers riskier or more difficult; rather it makes it less rewarding unless the thief steals the rack as well or sells the hangers to other hotels,” according to Hayes.While “benefit denial is not the total product protection answer for all assets in all places,” Hayes suggests that it is a good fit for today’s retailers, who are under pressure to enhance relationships with shoppers by providing open or self-serve merchandise access. “Benefit-denial technologies hold the promise of much more open selling of even high-value items,” according to Hayes.This concept—to deny the illicit use of smartphones—was at the foundation of Rent-A-Center’s winning asset protection strategy.Peacock and his team knew that the technology existed to lock cell phones and began to investigate how they could make it work for them. It was a thought exercise that the asset protection team was practiced at conducting. “We’re not the typical retailer, so the typical loss strategy won’t work for us in 80 to 90 percent of cases,” explained Peacock. “So we’re very used to thinking about how we can take an existing security solution and create a modified version that fits our business.”While phone-locking technology already existed for corporate devices, the AP team had to do some legwork in order to find a technology partner who could provide technology that would prevent phones from working even after a factory restore and resetting of the device. RAC’s new partner, an endpoint security company called Absolute, began working on the next step—development of the software local stores would install on each smartphone before it was rented.The whole asset protection project was implemented remarkably fast. In July 2014, RAC launched smartphones in all of its stores. In November, the asset protection team partnered with the largest smartphone data company to register the international mobile equipment identity (IMEI) numbers of all RAC smartphones to protect them from being sold or traded at other major retailers. In April 2015, the RAC asset protection team launched its Device Protection Program (DPP)—the technology-based solution to lock a device in the event it is lost, stolen, or has an expired contract.Rollout and ResultsWebinars for every store manager in the country, led by AP and supported by RAC’s mobile training group, was key to a successful rollout of the DPP. Adoption was aided by the fact that the LP program opened up a lucrative product category many stores had shied away from. “They absolutely loved it and couldn’t wait to get it,” said Peacock. “Part of their bonus is based on store profitability, and stores were anxious to rent more smartphones.”Additionally, the asset protection team, in coordination with the sales and mobile training groups, created a resource manual for store personnel that walked them through the steps of the program, potential scenarios that could arise, and instructions for helping customers understand the program. The manual detailed specific instructions on issues, such as how to install the DPP software onto phones (using a micro USB provided to stores) and how to respond to customers who report that their phones are locked. Written scripts take staff through the correct way to interact with customers in a range of locked-phone scenarios, in the event someone bought a stolen phone or is past due on a payment, for example.At the heart of the DPP is RAC’s ability to lock a phone once the software is installed on a smartphone and it is rented. Locking scenarios include:If a smartphone customer is seven-plus days late on his or her payment, AP receives a notice from internal reports and automatically locks the device. The individual is only able to make emergency calls and receive calls, and a message appears—“This phone has been disabled because the lease agreement has expired. Please contact or visit your Rent-A-Center store to arrange payment or return the device.” Once payment is received, the customer is provided an unlock code to regain full use of their smartphone. “On the front end, we let customers know about the technology and that the phone will lock if they go seven days past due,” explained Peacock. “And we let them know that once a phone is paid out, we can remotely remove the software.”If an RAC customer attempts to sell a smartphone to a retail partner, a notification is sent to AP, who then disables the phone until it is recovered or a district manager authorizes the phone to stay on rent.When a customer reports a lost or stolen phone to RAC, AP disables the phone until it is recovered. That capability—that RAC can use the software to help retrieve a stolen device for customers—has been used as a selling point to customers. In this way, the locking software isn’t strictly viewed as a way to enforce payment.When a store charges off a phone as “Skip/Stolen” or “Inventory Shortage,” AP disables the phone until it is recovered.Once underway, the team anxiously awaited results from the DPP. One area of concern, which didn’t materialize, was that locking phones would cause a significant increase in returns. Instead, when faced with a locked device, most customers simply paid up. “People can’t imagine living without their phones, and we had a dramatic increase in payments,” said Peacock. From a technical perspective, Peacock said the phone-locking process has been smooth. However, with 180,000 locks placed on smartphones last year, AP is working with the RAC IT team to automate additional aspects of the process.Perhaps the most important benefit, however, is the fact that most customers don’t put the locking software to the test. When a smartphone has the device protection application installed, it’s 50 percent less likely to go seven or more days past due compared to devices without the program installed, RAC data show. The 50 percent reduction in past dues equated to a 50 percent reduction in losses for the company. When devices do go past due, more than 60 percent of customers either make a payment or return the device within 72 hours of being locked.Investigations have also benefited from the ability to pull the phone number from the SIM card within the device. This capability has assisted in the successful resolution of numerous internal and external investigations, according to Peacock, for example cross referencing a stolen phone’s number, identifying a suspect, and calling the number to conduct an impromptu interview.From deterring theft, reducing loss, and improving collections, RAC’s AP team calculated millions in savings within the first twelve months of the DPP. With those results, it’s no surprise that Peacock, who has spent twenty years in the loss prevention industry, called it “one of the most innovative and rewarding projects I’ve worked on.”Check out the full article, “Product Protection,” which was originally published in 2017, to learn why Peacock thinks the endeavor was a successful one. This excerpt was updated October 10, 2018. Stay UpdatedGet critical information for loss prevention professionals, security and retail management delivered right to your inbox.  Sign up nowlast_img read more

Multi-platform PaaS Provider DotCloud Comes Out of Beta

Posted in yemiwbag on December 16th, 2019

first_imgRelated Posts High Availability: Applications built on DotCloud can automatically span multiple availability zones and datacenters, seamlessly distributing traffic between locations and providing automatic failover.Dynamic scaling: As traffic to a stack or database increases, DotCloud makes it incredibly easy to allocate additional resources to ensure it can effectively handle the load.DotCloud detailed its response to the AWS outage in a blog entry. There’s been a surge in platform-as-a-service providers in the past year, but many of them remain in private beta. Today one more is open to the public: DotCloud.DotCloud supports PHP, Ruby, Python, Perl, Java, Node.JS, MySQL, Redis, RabbitMQ, Solr, MongoDB and PostgreSQL. Like many other PaaSes, it runs on Amazon Web Services.Last month DotCloud bought DuoStack, a similar multi-platform PaaS.As part of the move to general availability, DotCloud also announced the following new features to improve resilience during AWS outages. According to it announcement: Why Tech Companies Need Simpler Terms of Servic… Tags:#cloud#news Top Reasons to Go With Managed WordPress Hosting klint finley 8 Best WordPress Hosting Solutions on the Market A Web Developer’s New Best Friend is the AI Wai…last_img read more