Posts under "avadfeqk"

Essequibo shines

Posted in avadfeqk on January 14th, 2020

first_imgPradesh Dwarka Pradesh Dwarka, a student of CV Nunes Primary School on the Essequibo Coast secured 522 marks at the National Grade Six Assessment (NGSA) examinations and was awarded a spot at Queen’s College in Georgetown. Pradesh, who copped the second spot in Region Two (Pomeroon-Supenaam), said he was very happy, excited and relieved when he heard the good news. He said he was confident of doing well since he was always consistent with his grades throughout his primary education. Pradesh said he felt rewarded for all his hard work and effort, staying up late at nights burning the midnight oil.Pradesh DwarkaHe gave praise and thanks to God for guidance when he felt like giving up and also all the teachers of CV Nunes, especially his teachers, Miss Binda  Ketwaru and  Sir Rezwan Persaud who played an important role in him achieving this feat. More importantly, he said he could not have done it without his mom who sat and studied with him late at nights. She would explain, in detail, whatever he needed more clarity on.One of the challenges he faced was preparing for the exams with time being an important factor. It was stressful since they had to complete assignments, extra lessons and study, but he managed and balanced this out by having some recreational time with family. He plans to continue his education at the Anna Regina Multilateral School (ARMS) and pursue a career in software engineering. His advice to future candidates is to study hard and be prepared.Gevasha HarpaulGevasha Harpaul, another student of CV Nunes Primary School on the Essequibo Coast, also secured 522 marks at the National Grade Six Assessment (NGSA) examinations and was awarded a spot at Queen’s College in Georgetown. Gevasha copped the third spot in Region Two (Pomeroon-Supenaam).“I am delighted to be placed third in my Region and gaining a place at my dream school at Queen’s College. The road to success was very challenging, as it required a lot of discipline and commitment. I had to let go of many things, but my parents ensured that I still had time to relax by watching TV, playing games and listening to music. They believed all work and no play would make me a dull girl. I owe my success firstly to God for his divine blessings; to my father, who studied with me; my mother, who prepared questions; my Nani (maternal grandmother), who cooked delicious meals when I needed; my Ajee (paternal grandmother), who gave me massages; and all other family members and friends who supported me, ” she said.“I also owe great gratitude to all the teachers of CV Nunes Primary School, particularly Ms Ketwaru, Mr Rezwan Persaud, Ms Doodmattie Doodnauth, Ms Raywattie Deonarine and Ms Nadiera Drikpaul. My advice to future NGSA candidates is to focus on your studies, revise your work, pay attention in class, have some fun, and always pray to God.”Gevasha Harpaullast_img read more

Driver released after night in hospital

Posted in avadfeqk on January 11th, 2020

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NewsLite: Gehry design set for singer Mariza

Posted in avadfeqk on January 6th, 2020

first_imgThe D’Amatos celebrate their third anniversary next week; his birthday is Aug. 1. – Associated Press160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! Gehry said he met Mariza several years ago in Lisbon and was enamored by fado, Portuguese folk music that often has mournful lyrics. The music genre began in working-class neighborhoods and was performed in tavernas where people sat at tables singing and drinking wine. “It’s a very intimate setting and there is a dark ambiance,” said the 33-year-old Mariza, who is touring the United States this year. “It’s a huge privilege to have my own taverna directed by Mr. Gehry.” Ex-Sen. D’Amato to be dad at 70 Former Sen. Alfonse D’Amato is looking forward to a few big milestones – his anniversary, his 70th birthday and a baby. “If you had told me this prior to getting married, I would have said you’re out of your mind,” D’Amato joked Friday as he confirmed his wife, attorney Katuria D’Amato, 41, is due in February. Architect Frank Gehry will design a set for a performance by Portuguese fado singer Mariza later this year. Gehry, renowned for his stunning and daring urban visions, has agreed to create a taverna-inspired stage for Mariza’s performance in October at the Walt Disney Concert Hall in Los Angeles. The melding of the two arts Gehry promises will make for a very special evening in the building he conceived. “I want this set to enhance and support her,” Gehry, 78, said Friday. “It’s not going to be a Frank Gehry set. You won’t recognize it.” last_img read more

Calderon calling kettle black?

Posted in avadfeqk on January 3rd, 2020

first_imgMigrants from the Dominican Republic, where a quarter of the population is below the poverty line, pay smugglers to take them in small boats called yolas 80 miles across the treacherous Mona Passage to Puerto Rico – where, with 4 million people living on land less spacious than three Rhode Islands, illegal immigration is felt especially acutely. The overstuffed yolas face overwhelming currents, and smugglers will toss Dominicans into the sea if the weight in the boat is too much, or leave them on deserted islands to starve. That is, if the migrants survive the sharks teeming below the water’s surface. Fortunate Dominicans are plucked from the yolas by U.S. Coast Guard patrols before they can become shark bait, and, after photos and fingerprinting, are safely repatriated to their home island. On Saturday, the Coast Guard located a 35-foot yola with 31 hungry and dehydrated Dominican migrants after responding to a cell-phone distress call with 20 searches over four days covering 2,400 square miles. It’s a far cry from what happens on Mexico’s southern border. While President Felipe Calderon vowed in his state of the nation speech Sunday to mount “an energetic protest at the unilateral measures taken by the U.S. Congress and government which exacerbate the persecution and abusive treatment of undocumented Mexican workers,” Central American immigrants trying to cross into Mexico face real abuse. If they don’t fall prey to criminal gangs on the border, they’re subject to shakedowns or worse by notoriously nefarious Mexican authorities. The State Department cites “credible reports that police, immigration, and customs officials frequently violated the rights of undocumented migrants, including rape.” Ironically, according to the Center for Immigration Studies, many Mexican landowners claim that they prefer Guatemalans to work the fields because Mexicans won’t do the hard work on the banana and coffee plantations. And, making Calderon sound even more like the pot calling the kettle black, Mexican authorities regularly check IDs to locate illegal Central American immigrants and make about 200,000 arrests and deportations each year. I asked the taxi driver in Spanish to stop at Fort San Cristobal, but he brushed me off and continued to hurtle past the historic site and into San Juan’s rush-hour traffic. I considered my options for opening the door and diving onto the pavement just as the driver stopped in a cul-de-sac on the Isla Verde beachfront – decidedly the wrong spot, unless the colonial Spanish used tourist hotels and bars as fortifications. I shooed off the bad cabbie and got into the taxi of Marcos, a Venezuelan immigrant and decade-long Puerto Rican resident. “He was Dominican!” Marcos proclaimed of my previous, errant cab driver. “Don’t get a ride from a Dominican!” He proceeded to describe how migrants from the Dominican Republic illegally enter Puerto Rico, taking low-wage jobs and not integrating well. Later, a waiter bluntly told me, “How Mexicans are to the U.S., Dominicans are to us.” A recent Inter Press Service story said that Sin Fronteras (Without Borders) activists trying to defend Central American immigrants have been harassed and intimidated by Mexican authorities. “The activists accuse the authorities of double standards,” stated IPS writer Diego Cevallos, “because they vehemently protest the treatment received by undocumented immigrants in the United States while reacting much less vigorously to reports of abuses against Central American immigrants in Mexico.” Because the grass always appears greener on the other side of the border, migrants keep trying to cross. Everywhere. France has been trying for years to crack down on illegal immigration. Morocco has deported illegal immigrants to the middle of the Sahara. Turkey has accused Greece of throwing illegal immigrants into the sea. And everywhere there is illegal immigration, there are root concerns of security, economy and national identity. “Mexico does not end at its borders,” Calderon said Sunday. “Where there is a Mexican, there is Mexico.” Would he also agree that where there is a Guatemalan, there is Guatemala? Would Puerto Ricans agree that where there is a Dominican, there is the Dominican Republic? And is Mexico saving the migrants from the sharks or rescuing them from the brutal southwestern U.S. desert, or leaving them at the hands of Mara Salvatrucha, unscrupulous plantation owners and criminal officials? Bridget Johnson writes for the Daily News and blogs at insidesocal.com/friendlyfire.160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set!last_img read more

Hornaday returns to Southland

Posted in avadfeqk on December 27th, 2019

first_imgNASCAR announced its Truck Series schedule Tuesday. The Truck Series will make its only visit to California on Feb. 23, the second race of the season. It will be at California Speedway in Fontana the same weekend as the NASCAR Busch Series and Nextel Cup Series races. The eighth race of the season, at Dover International Speedway in Delaware, will mark the 300th race in Truck Series history. The Truck Series will be visiting the same 22 tracks as it did in 2006. There are 25 races scheduled, starting at Daytona International Speedway on Feb. 16 and ending at Homestead-Miami Speedway on Nov. 16. Irwindale Speedway: Canyon Country’s Aaron Staudinger finished fourth in the NASCAR Late Model open invitational last Saturday night at Irwindale Speedway. Tim Huddleston of Agoura Hills won the open invitational, the last Late Model race of the season at Irwindale Speedway. Tom Rizzo of Acton was 14th. In other action, rookie Matthew Hicks of Santee won the NASCAR Super Trucks race. Mike Fortier of Santa Clarita was sixth; Logan Henson of Valencia was 10th; Pat Mintey Jr. of Quartz Hill was 17th and Brian Reed of Castaic was 22nd. Rick Crow of Simi Valley won the NASCAR Pure Stocks race and the division championship. Jim Shackleford of Indianapolis won the figure 8 world championship race. Steve Rogers of Riverside won the NASCAR Mini Stocks race. timothy.haddock@dailynews.com (818) 713-3715 2007 NASCAR CRAFTSMAN TRUCK SERIES SCHEDULE Feb. 16: Daytona International Speedway Feb. 23: California Speedway March 16: Atlanta Motor Speedway March 31: Martinsville Speedway April 28: Kansas Speedway May 18: Lowe’s Motor Speedway May 26: Mansfield Motorsports Speedway June 1: Dover International Speedway June 8: Texas Motor Speedway June 16: Michigan International Speedway June 22: The Milwaukee Mile June 30: Memphis Motorsports Park July 14: Kentucky Speedway July 27: O’Reilly Raceway Park at Indianapolis Aug. 11: Nashville Superspeedway Aug. 22: Bristol Motor Speedway Sept. 1: Gateway International Raceway Sept. 15: New Hampshire International Speedway Sept. 22: Las Vegas Motor Speedway Oct. 6: Talladega Superspeedway Oct. 20: Martinsville Speedway Oct. 27: Atlanta Motor Speedway Nov. 2: Texas Motor Speedway Nov. 9: Phoenix International Raceway Nov. 16: Homestead-Miami Speedway160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MOREThe joys and headaches of holiday travel: John PhillipsHornaday squeaked past a last-lap crash at Talladega to finish 10th in the first Truck Series race at the biggest and fastest track on the NASCAR schedule. “It was actually pretty calm, it was calmer than I thought it would be,” said Hornaday, who is sixth in points in the Truck Series standings. “I will tell you what; you have to do a lot of driving here, a lot of lifting, a lot of gas. I just want to thank Kevin and DeLana Harvick, AES, Chevrolet to give me the opportunity to have this much fun racing at Talladega in our Silverado.” Mark Martin won the Truck Series race at Talladega and became the first driver to win a race in the three national touring divisions of NASCAR. Martin has won races at Talledega at the Cup, Busch and Truck series levels. “It was a really, really great race; a clean race,” said Martin, who started his Roush Racing F-150 from the pole with a qualifying lap of 182.320 mph. “The drivers did a spectacular job. They didn’t get over their heads or get too aggressive. They got to racing big on the last lap and there was an accident but other than that they really used their heads.” The Truck Series resumes its schedule Oct. 21 at Martinsville Speedway in Virginia. Fresh off a 10th-place finish in the first NASCAR Craftsman Truck Series race at Talladega Superspeedway in Alabama, Ron Hornaday Jr. is returning to Southern California for a late model race tonight. Hornaday, a former Saugus Speedway champ from Palmdale, will be entered in a 100-lap super late model race at The Orange Show in San Bernardino. “I love racing at Orange Show,” Hornaday said. “It will be fun going back there.” Hornaday will be driving a car owned by Gary Stockman, whose son Danny is a crew member on Hornaday’s No. 33 Chevrolet Silverado team for Kevin Harvick Inc. last_img read more

French Research Unions Challenge Plan to Focus Science Funding

Posted in avadfeqk on December 3rd, 2019

first_imgMoney Versus égalité. France’s researcher unions take the country’s national motto—Liberty, Equality, Fraternity—to heart. It may sound ungrateful, especially given the difficult financial times facing Europe, but part of the French scientific community has brought legal action against the country’s new government in order to cancel €7.7 billion worth of funding agreements intended for the development of national excellence clusters. The reason? Such concentration of science funding apparently offends the researchers’ sense of égalité. At the heart of the fight is the Excellence Initiatives (IdEx) program, which France’s former President Nicolas Sarkozy launched in 2010 as part of a €21.9 billion boost to research and higher education. The IdEx program, which was allocated €7.7 billion, aims “to allow between five and 10 world-class multidisciplinary poles of excellence in higher education and research to emerge in France,” according to a recent press release. With the aid of an international jury, Sarkozy’s government selected 8 clusters of universities and institutions to receive an IdEx award: namely IdEx Bordeaux, the University of Strasbourg (Unistra), Paris Sciences et Lettres, Aix-Marseille University IdEx (A*MIDEX), the University of Toulouse (UNITI), IdEx Paris-Saclay, Sorbonne University, and Sorbonne Paris-Cité University. The IdEx awards consist of endowments of between €700 million and €1 billion, which the government holds onto but yields approximately 3.4% in interest for each cluster to use over the next 4 years. That’s “a small fraction of the total budget of the university,” but it is valuable for catalyzing new infrastructure and initiatives, says pharmacologist Alain Beretz, who is president of the Unistra and put forward its IdEx project. But the program has raised criticism from Socialist national unions, and the signing of IdEx agreements just before the French general elections in April set fire to the powder. France’s national researcher unions and other critics of the IdEx program contend that it threatens core principles—equality, democracy, and a collegial administration—dear to research and higher education in the nation. By concentrating the resources of the national financial boost on a selected number of clusters, “the call for IdEx projects accentuates the inequalities between staff, between students, between establishments, between territories, often even within the same territory,” the French National Trade Union of Scientific Researchers (SNCS-FSU) and the National Union of Higher Education Professors (SNESUP-FSU) jointly stated on 14 May. The speedy and pressured signature of IdEx “agreements furthermore aims to lock in some institutional transformations that scorn all the principles of collegial and democratic representation,” the unions added. They requested that the signed agreements be cancelled and all the funding programs created under the financial boost be reconsidered. Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*) Last Wednesday, “in absence of a concrete response from the ministry for higher education and research,” SNCS-FSU announced the launch of a series of legal actions against the newly elected Socialist government. SNCS-FSU presented two submissions to Higher Education and Research Minister Geneviève Fioraso for an out-of-court settlement regarding “the multiple violations of the statutes of public establishments” carried out during the “rushed” signing of agreements between the previous government and IdEx Paris-Saclay and A*MIDEX. SNCS-FSU also sent the tribunal dealing with internal disputes in the French civil service a request for a legal settlement against the commitment letter signed by the president of the National Institute of Oriental Languages and Civilization in Paris for the Sorbonne Paris-Cité IdEx. “These commitments have indeed been made without the consultation of the administration councils of the concerned establishments while these administration councils are, by law, the only ones to have such budgetary competence,” SNCS-FSU states. So far, six out of the eight IdEx agreements have been signed by the French government and relevant institutions, with only the Sorbonne Paris-Cité cluster and the UNITI project in Toulouse not yet officially settled. The newly elected presidents of three of the institutes involved in the UNITI project—the Paul Sabatier University, the University of Toulouse-Le Mirail, and the National Polytechnic Institute of Toulouse—have said that they first want to consult with the local academic community. Outside of changing the governance model so that the people in charge of the new IdEx cluster are elected rather than nominated, the new presidents want to broaden the so-called perimeter of excellence, the research themes and labs each IdEx plans to focus on, to more disciplines so as not to create “segregation,” says Bertrand Monthubert, a mathematician at Paul Sabatier University who is also the national secretary of higher education and research for the Socialist Party. “We want to build this [new] University of Toulouse,” Monthubert adds. But “we [must] find a way to do it so that the people feel involved with this project.” But as Beretz sees it, “the IdEx is a merit-based competition judged exclusively by a jury of international peers, with very little, if any, political interference. I do not know of any scientist that would oppose such a scheme,” he says. “Some of the other questions raised by the IdEx”—like the fate of smaller excellence centers, or the lack of geographical heterogeneity in the repartition of the winning sites—”are of [a] political nature, and thus should be answered by politicians, not scientists,” he adds. One adequate political answer to these issues, however, “cannot just be to give less to the excellence centers, because this will automatically lead to a reduced excellence and lack of competitivity of French science.” The new minister hasn’t responded to the legal actions, but in a recent interview (in French) with national newspaper Le Monde, Fioraso stated that the government will “reexamine the IdEx [projects] from every angle.” She reassured the scientific community that no brutal changes would be made. “We will not damage any good project,” Fioraso said, noting that the government will, however, modify the vision of the program by reequilibrating its geographical representation, since the North, West, and Rhône-Alpes regions of France did not win any of the original eight IdEx awards.last_img read more

Economics Nobel honors study of consumption differences between rich and poor

Posted in avadfeqk on December 1st, 2019

first_imgThis year’s Nobel Prize in Economics honors a scholar whose work has bridged the conceptual gap between the masses and the individual, injected data into the realm of conjecture, and developed tools to help fight global poverty. Angus Deaton, 69, a British-American economist at Princeton University, pioneered the study of consumption among poor families and individuals and how it differs from that of more affluent people.Deaton’s work has enabled economists to better model overall consumption and the effects of economic policies and has played an important role in the dramatic reduction in abject poverty seen globally in the past 3 decades. The $980,000 Sveriges Riksbank Prize in Economic Sciences in Memory of Alfred Nobel, as the award is officially called, wasn’t established in Alfred Nobel’s will but created in 1969 with an endowment from Sweden’s central bank.”It’s long overdue,” says Oriana Bandiera, a labor and development economist at the London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE), of Deaton’s prize. “Professor Deaton’s contributions to the field have been profound and transformative.” Diana Weinhold, an international development economist at LSE, notes that Deaton’s work is so foundational that many younger economists just take it for granted. “A lot of the contributions that Deaton pushed through now seem completely obvious,” Weinhold says.Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)Deaton made seminal contributions in three areas, economists say. First, he studied so-called demand systems, essentially mathematical models of how consumption of goods depends on their prices and utility—the sort of stuff you’d find in an economics textbook. In 1980, he developed the so-called “almost ideal demand system” to model consumption at the individual, or microeconomic, level. That theoretical advance has now become part of bedrock economic theory and a standard tool for policymakers. “It completely revolutionized how we look at, measure, and understand consumption,” Bandiera says.Deaton then turned his insights to the collective, macroeconomic level, to identify and resolve a problem in the theory of consumption. In macroeconomic modeling, economists had generally focused on aggregate measures such as the average amount of consumption as embodied in a fictitious “representative agent.” “Poor households were presumed to behave in roughly the same way as rich households, only with less money at their disposal,” Tore Ellingsen, an economist at the Stockholm School of Economics, explained during the press conference to announce the prize today.But such models often produced incorrect results, a mismatch that became known as Deaton’s paradox. Deaton showed that to resolve the paradox economists had to examine how price changes, income changes, and other factors would affect consumption of diverse individuals, both richer and poorer, and then sum up the individual results.For example, suppose a government wishes to raise revenue by increasing the sales tax. The increase may hardly bother richer individuals who can easily afford it, but it may drastically alter the consumption patterns of poorer people who already have little to spare, Stockholm University economist Jakob Svensson, a member of the prize committee, explained at the same press conference. Only by accounting for such differences can economists and policymakers accurately predict the effects of a tax hike and determine its optimal size.Finally, Deaton has studied poverty around the globe and how best to fight it. Speaking on the phone at the press conference, the laureate explained that he had studied poverty in the United States, the United Kingdom, South Africa, and, in particular, in India. He relied primarily on data collected by statistical office in various countries, which he praised as “great unsung heroes.” Deaton’s contributions include helping develop more consistent quantitative measures of consumption, Bandiera says.Deaton sounded jovial today. “Gosh, I was sleepy, so it’s hard to remember exactly how I felt” when the early morning call from the Nobel organization came, he told reporters. “Obviously like many economists I knew that it was a possibility. But in any given year the odds are very, very small. I was surprised and delighted.”But if Deaton seems like a bookish academic, he has not shied away from speaking up on real-world issues. For example, he has warned of the dangers of increasing economic inequality in the United States and has been critical of international aid as a means of combating poverty.Deaton’s peers say that his work has played an important role in reducing the worst poverty, the rate of which has fallen in recent decades. For example, according to data collected by the World Bank, in 2012, 896 million people lived on less than $1.90 a day, compared with 1.91 billion in 1990. Although the numerical definition of abject poverty remains controversial—the decrease is much more modest if the line is set at $2.00 per day—other measures such as literacy, health, and life expectancy show that the lot of many of the poorest has improved, Weinhold says, especially in China. Deaton’s efforts have contributed to such improvement, Weinhold says: “He’s got his mitts in everything.”Although abject poverty will likely continue to decrease, vast numbers of people continue to live in destitution, Deaton noted. “While things continue to get better, you have to remember that things are very, very bad for many people,” he said. “It’s not a good world, but it’s getting better.”*Update, 12 October, 10:57 a.m.: The story has been updated and expanded.*Update, 12 October, 1:12 p.m.: The story has been updated to include comments from Deaton’s peers.last_img read more

India route Lebanon 6-0 in AFC U-16 football qualifiers

Posted in avadfeqk on November 26th, 2019

first_imgTabriz City (Iran), Sep 20 (PTI) Suresh Singh struck a brilliant hat-trick as India thrashed Lebanon 6-0 to end their AFC Under-16 Qualifiers campaign in style here today. Suresh scored in the 29th, 71st and 89th minutes while Komal Thatal and Amarjit Singh found the net in the 77th and 80th minutes. Lebanon player Habib Baladi scored an own goal in the 75th minute as the Indian boys routed the opposition side in a one-sided Group E match at Yadegar Emam Stadium. With the win today, India ended at second place in the group with six points behind Iran, who thrashed Bahrain 6-0 in another match today to top the group the group by winning all the three matches. India had beaten Bahrain 5-0 before losing to Iran 0-3. India have already qualified for the 2016 AFC Under-16 Championships final round as the host country but still they took part in the qualifiers to gain experience. Eleven group winners and four best second-placed teams in the qualifiers will join India in next years finals, with the tournament hosts receiving an automatic qualification. The Indian boys took some time to settle down and they also missed a few chances in the initial minutes. They dominated the first half but could score just one goal. After the change of ends, the Indians continued from where they left in the first 45 minutes but still goals eluded them till the final quarter of the match. Suddenly the floodgates were opened once the second goal was scored in the 71st minute. Habibs own goal in the 75th minute was a result of incessant pressure applied by the Indians who pumped in three quick goals towards the end of the match. PTI PDS PDSadvertisementlast_img read more

Former Real Madrid forward Raul to retire in November

Posted in avadfeqk on November 26th, 2019

first_imgFormer Real Madrid forward Raul, the Spanish giants’ joint-record scorer, will hang up his boots in November after a stellar 21-year career as one of the game’s finest talents.Raul, who now plays for the New York Cosmos, won an impressive haul of trophies while at the Bernabeu, including three Champions League crowns and six La Liga titles.The 38-year-old will retire at the end of the North American Football League (NASL) season having made his debut in April for the Cosmos who play one tier below Major League Football.”When I signed for the New York Cosmos in December, I said I would evaluate how I felt towards the end of the year and assess whether I would continue to play,” Raul said in a statement.”My decision is to retire from playing at the end of this season. I am fully focussed on finishing the season strong and helping the New York Cosmos win the NASL Championship. In the coming months I will decide the next step in my career.”Also read: Champions League – Record for Ronaldo in another Madrid win Raul, who shares Real’s scoring record with Cristiano Ronaldo, having netted 323 times in 741 games, also serves as a technical adviser for the Cosmos youth academy and is expected to take over on a full-time basis after he retires.”Playing football has been part of my life for so long and the decision to retire is not an easy one but I believe it is the right time,” said Raul, who made his Spain debut in 1996 and scored 44 goals in 102 internationals over 10 years.advertisement”I’m thankful to everyone who has supported me throughout my career and I look forward to playing my final games with the New York Cosmos over the coming weeks.”After a spell in Atletico Madrid’s academy, Raul joined local rivals Real in the 1992-93 season. He made his debut for “Los Blancos” in October 1994 in a league game at Real Zaragoza.Also read: Unfair to compare Ronaldo with Messi, says football legend Pele He left Real in 2010 and joined Schalke 04, helping the Bundesliga side reach the Champions League semi-finals in 2011.He moved to Al-Sadd Sports Club of Qatar in 2012, before joining the Cosmos, who won the NASL’s spring season title and have lost only one home game in 18 months to sit third in the table with a place in the four-team Championship assured.Cosmos head coach Giovanni Savarese said: “Raul is one of the world’s most iconic players. I knew when we signed him what he would bring on pitch but his knowledge, passion, professionalism and commitment has exceeded my expectations.”last_img read more

Kochi to host ISL 2016 finale

Posted in avadfeqk on November 20th, 2019

first_imgNew Delhi, Dec 2 (PTI) The city of Kochi in Kerala was today selected as venue for the Indian Super League finale on December 18. “Kerala has been the bedrock of Indian football. It is one of the few states in the country where interest in football is unparallelled. I have always been intrigued by the pride and passion of the football fans in Kerala,” Nita Ambani, Chairperson, Football Sports Development Limited, that runs ISL, said in a release. “We felt that awarding the prestigious final of ISL 2016 to Kochi would be an apt ode to the State?s contribution to Indian football,” she added. PTI AT ATlast_img read more